Factors affecting recruitment into child and adolescent psychiatry training

Jon Shaw, John E Lewis, Shalini Katyal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The authors studied the factors affecting the recruitment into child and adolescent psychiatry training in the United States. Methods: Medical students (n = 154) and general and child and adolescent psychiatry residents (n = 111) completed a questionnaire to evaluate career choice in child psychiatry (n = 265). Results: Compared with medical students, general and child and adolescent psychiatry residents were more likely socially related; extroverted; empathic; warm; tolerant of ambiguity; interested in quality of life, social systems, and a developmental perspective; and to espouse greater satisfaction working with psychiatric patients, but less interested in sports or outdoor activities. Seventy-eight percent of medical students considered psychiatry as a potential career, and 28% indicated a strong interest in psychiatry. Sixty-four percent ofgeneral psychiatry residents considered child psychiatry as a career. Reasons precluding child psychiatry were preference for working with adults (33%), the clinical child rotation (19%), years of training (13%), and indebtedness (3%). Conclusions: More effort is needed to address the barriers to selecting child psychiatry as a career among medical students and general psychiatry residents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)183-189
Number of pages7
JournalAcademic Psychiatry
Volume34
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2010

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Education
  • Medicine(all)

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