Factors affecting recruitment into child and adolescent psychiatry training

Jon Shaw, John E Lewis, Shalini Katyal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The authors studied the factors affecting the recruitment into child and adolescent psychiatry training in the United States. Methods: Medical students (n = 154) and general and child and adolescent psychiatry residents (n = 111) completed a questionnaire to evaluate career choice in child psychiatry (n = 265). Results: Compared with medical students, general and child and adolescent psychiatry residents were more likely socially related; extroverted; empathic; warm; tolerant of ambiguity; interested in quality of life, social systems, and a developmental perspective; and to espouse greater satisfaction working with psychiatric patients, but less interested in sports or outdoor activities. Seventy-eight percent of medical students considered psychiatry as a potential career, and 28% indicated a strong interest in psychiatry. Sixty-four percent ofgeneral psychiatry residents considered child psychiatry as a career. Reasons precluding child psychiatry were preference for working with adults (33%), the clinical child rotation (19%), years of training (13%), and indebtedness (3%). Conclusions: More effort is needed to address the barriers to selecting child psychiatry as a career among medical students and general psychiatry residents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)183-189
Number of pages7
JournalAcademic Psychiatry
Volume34
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2010

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Adolescent Psychiatry
Child Psychiatry
psychiatry
child psychiatry
adolescent
Psychiatry
Medical Students
medical student
career
resident
Career Choice
social system
indebtedness
Sports
quality of life
Quality of Life
questionnaire

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Education
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Factors affecting recruitment into child and adolescent psychiatry training. / Shaw, Jon; Lewis, John E; Katyal, Shalini.

In: Academic Psychiatry, Vol. 34, No. 3, 01.05.2010, p. 183-189.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shaw, Jon ; Lewis, John E ; Katyal, Shalini. / Factors affecting recruitment into child and adolescent psychiatry training. In: Academic Psychiatry. 2010 ; Vol. 34, No. 3. pp. 183-189.
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