Facilitators and Barriers to Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Use Among Black Individuals in the United States: Results from the National Survey on HIV in the Black Community (NSHBC)

Bisola O. Ojikutu, Laura M. Bogart, Molly Higgins-Biddle, Sannisha K. Dale, Wanda Allen, Tiffany Dominique, Kenneth H. Mayer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study explores willingness to use PrEP among Black individuals in the US. From February to April 2016, an online survey was administered to a nationally representative sample of Black individuals. 855 individuals who were HIV negative by self-report participated [mean age: 33.6 (SD 9.2); 45.5% male]. Among all respondents, 14.5% were aware of, and 26.0% would be willing to use PrEP. Among high-risk individuals (N = 327), 19.8% knew about and 35.1% would be willing to use PrEP. The most common reason for lack of willingness among high-risk individuals was low self-perceived risk (65.1%). In multivariate analysis, individuals reporting single marital status [OR 1.8 (1.2, 2.5), p = 0.002], depressive symptoms [OR 1.6 (1.2, 2.2), p = 0.0054], arrest history [OR 1.7(1.2, 2.4), p = 0.0003], PrEP knowledge [OR 1.5 (1.0, 2.3), p = 0.0247] and belief in HIV conspiracies [OR 1.3 (1.1, 1.5), p = 0.0075] were more willing to use PrEP. Participants who saw a health care provider less frequently were less willing to use PrEP [OR 0.5 (0.4, 0.8), p = 0.0044]. Among a nationally representative sample of Black individuals, few high risk individuals were willing to use PrEP. Interventions to increase risk awareness, PrEP knowledge and access to care are necessary to improve PrEP uptake.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3576-3587
Number of pages12
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume22
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

Keywords

  • Black individuals in the US
  • HIV
  • HIV risk behavior
  • Pre-exposure prophylaxis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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