Facilitated percutaneous coronary intervention in acute myocardial infarction: attractive concept but difficult to prove!

Robert V. Kelly, Mauricio G Cohen, E. Magnus Ohman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Facilitated percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) refers to a strategy of immediate PCI following the administration of pharmacological therapies in acute myocardial infarction. It has evolved primarily from the time delays (due to geography or logistics) in getting acute myocardial infarction patients to the catheterization laboratory and the associated irreversible loss of myocardial muscle that occurs as door-to-balloon time increases. Facilitated PCI provides an opportunity to start treating many of these patients before they reach the catheterization laboratory and provides an ability to open the infarct-related artery before PCI, which is associated with better outcomes for AMI patients. Pharmacological strategies before PCI include: thrombolytic therapy, glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor alone, or a combination of thrombolytic therapy plus glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor. Initial results of angiographic studies show better patency with the latter strategy but at the expense of higher bleeding event rates. Ongoing trials are evaluating different combinations of thrombolytic and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)211-222
Number of pages12
JournalThe American heart hospital journal
Volume2
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Myocardial Infarction
Platelet Glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa Complex
Thrombolytic Therapy
Catheterization
Pharmacology
Geography
Arteries
Hemorrhage
Muscles
Therapeutics

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Facilitated percutaneous coronary intervention in acute myocardial infarction : attractive concept but difficult to prove! / Kelly, Robert V.; Cohen, Mauricio G; Ohman, E. Magnus.

In: The American heart hospital journal, Vol. 2, No. 4, 01.01.2004, p. 211-222.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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