Face Detection and the Development of Own-Species Bias in Infant Macaques

Elizabeth A Simpson, Krisztina V. Jakobsen, Fabrice Damon, Stephen J. Suomi, Pier F. Ferrari, Annika Paukner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In visually complex environments, numerous items compete for attention. Infants may exhibit attentional efficiency-privileged detection, attention capture, and holding-for face-like stimuli. However, it remains unknown when these biases develop and what role, if any, experience plays in this emerging skill. Here, nursery-reared infant macaques' (Macaca mulatta; n = 10) attention to faces in 10-item arrays of nonfaces was measured using eye tracking. With limited face experience, 3-week-old monkeys were more likely to detect faces and looked longer at faces compared to nonfaces, suggesting a robust face detection system. By 3 months, after peer exposure, infants looked faster to conspecific faces but not heterospecific faces, suggesting an own-species bias in face attention capture, consistent with perceptual attunement. Child Development

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalChild Development
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2016

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Macaca
infant
trend
stimulus
experience
efficiency
Nurseries
Child Development
Macaca mulatta
Haplorhini

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education

Cite this

Simpson, E. A., Jakobsen, K. V., Damon, F., Suomi, S. J., Ferrari, P. F., & Paukner, A. (Accepted/In press). Face Detection and the Development of Own-Species Bias in Infant Macaques. Child Development. https://doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12565

Face Detection and the Development of Own-Species Bias in Infant Macaques. / Simpson, Elizabeth A; Jakobsen, Krisztina V.; Damon, Fabrice; Suomi, Stephen J.; Ferrari, Pier F.; Paukner, Annika.

In: Child Development, 2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Simpson, Elizabeth A ; Jakobsen, Krisztina V. ; Damon, Fabrice ; Suomi, Stephen J. ; Ferrari, Pier F. ; Paukner, Annika. / Face Detection and the Development of Own-Species Bias in Infant Macaques. In: Child Development. 2016.
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