Exposure to ultraviolet radiation late in development increases the toxicity of oil to mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus) embryos

Lauren E. Sweet, Jason Magnuson, T. Ross Garner, Matthew M. Alloy, John Stieglitz, Daniel D Benetti, Martin Grosell, Aaron P. Roberts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010 overlapped with the spawning of many pelagic fish species in the Gulf of Mexico, including mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus). PAH released during the spill have been shown to cause photo-induced toxicity under UV radiation. To verify this, mahi-mahi embryos were exposed to high-energy water accommodated fractions of source and naturally weathered oils for up to 48 h. The co-exposure timing with UV radiation varied between an early development exposure for 8 hr or a late development exposure for 8 hr. The UV co-exposure had a photo-induced toxic effect on hatching success for all oil types and exposure scenarios. A more sensitive developmental window to photo-induced toxicity was observed when UV exposure occurred late in development. Source Oil B was over six-fold more toxic, and Massachusetts source oil was 1.6-fold more toxic when the embryos were co-exposed to UV light late in development. Weathered oil from the surface co-exposure with UV late in development resulted in bradycardia in the mahi-mahi.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1592-1598
Number of pages7
JournalEnvironmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Volume36
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

Keywords

  • Oil spills
  • Photo-induced toxicity
  • Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Exposure to ultraviolet radiation late in development increases the toxicity of oil to mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus) embryos'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this