Exposure to ultraviolet radiation late in development increases the toxicity of oil to mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus) embryos

Lauren E. Sweet, Jason Magnuson, T. Ross Garner, Matthew M. Alloy, John Stieglitz, Daniel D Benetti, Martin Grosell, Aaron P. Roberts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010 overlapped with the spawning of many pelagic fish species in the Gulf of Mexico, including mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus). PAH released during the spill have been shown to cause photo-induced toxicity under UV radiation. To verify this, mahi-mahi embryos were exposed to high-energy water accommodated fractions of source and naturally weathered oils for up to 48 h. The co-exposure timing with UV radiation varied between an early development exposure for 8 hr or a late development exposure for 8 hr. The UV co-exposure had a photo-induced toxic effect on hatching success for all oil types and exposure scenarios. A more sensitive developmental window to photo-induced toxicity was observed when UV exposure occurred late in development. Source Oil B was over six-fold more toxic, and Massachusetts source oil was 1.6-fold more toxic when the embryos were co-exposed to UV light late in development. Weathered oil from the surface co-exposure with UV late in development resulted in bradycardia in the mahi-mahi.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1592-1598
Number of pages7
JournalEnvironmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Volume36
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

Fingerprint

Perciformes
ultraviolet radiation
Ultraviolet radiation
Toxicity
embryo
Oils
Embryonic Structures
Radiation
Poisons
toxicity
oil
Gulf of Mexico
Petroleum Pollution
Oil spills
Hazardous materials spills
Ultraviolet Rays
Bradycardia
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons
fold
Fish

Keywords

  • Oil spills
  • Photo-induced toxicity
  • Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Exposure to ultraviolet radiation late in development increases the toxicity of oil to mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus) embryos. / Sweet, Lauren E.; Magnuson, Jason; Garner, T. Ross; Alloy, Matthew M.; Stieglitz, John; Benetti, Daniel D; Grosell, Martin; Roberts, Aaron P.

In: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, Vol. 36, No. 6, 01.06.2017, p. 1592-1598.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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