Exposure to terrorism, stress-related mental health symptoms, and defensive coping among Jews and Arabs in Israel

Stevan E. Hobfoll, Daphna Canetti-Nisim, Robert J. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

221 Scopus citations

Abstract

The authors conducted a large-scale study of terrorism in Israel via telephone surveys in September 2003 with 905 adult Jewish and Palestinian citizens of Israel (PCIs). Structural equation path modeling indicated that exposure to terrorism was significantly related to greater loss and gain of psychosocial resources and to greater posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depressive symptoms. Psychosocial resource loss and gain associated with terrorism were, in turn, significantly related to both greater PTSD and depressive symptoms. PCIs had significantly higher levels of PTSD and depressive symptoms than Jews. Further, PTSD symptoms in particular were related to greater authoritarian beliefs and ethnocentrism, suggesting how PTSD may lead to a self-protective style of defensive coping.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-218
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of consulting and clinical psychology
Volume74
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2006

Keywords

  • Depression
  • PTSD
  • Political violence
  • Resiliency
  • Terrorism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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