Exploring the unique and interactive roles of distress tolerance and negative urgency in obsessions

Jesse R. Cougle, Kiara R Timpano, Amy R. Goetz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent research has implicated relationships between emotion dysregulation and obsessions. Evidence suggests low distress tolerance and greater tendency to act impulsively in the face of negative affect (or negative urgency) are strongly related to obsessions. The current study sought to examine the unique and interactive roles of distress tolerance and negative urgency in the prediction of obsessions. A large non-clinical sample (N=238) was administered a range of self-report measures. Results revealed that both poor distress tolerance and greater negative urgency were uniquely associated with obsessions but not other obsessive-compulsive symptoms, even when controlling for gender, depression, anxiety, and generalized anxiety disorder symptoms. Additionally, low distress tolerance and high negative urgency interacted with each other in the prediction of greater obsession symptoms. Overall, the findings help clarify the emerging literature linking emotion dysregulation to obsessions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)515-520
Number of pages6
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume52
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2012

Fingerprint

Obsessive Behavior
Emotions
Anxiety Disorders
Self Report
Anxiety
Depression
Research

Keywords

  • Distress tolerance
  • Emotion regulation
  • Negative urgency
  • Obsessions
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Exploring the unique and interactive roles of distress tolerance and negative urgency in obsessions. / Cougle, Jesse R.; Timpano, Kiara R; Goetz, Amy R.

In: Personality and Individual Differences, Vol. 52, No. 4, 01.03.2012, p. 515-520.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{1b9e7a0ae3d742f499384b83c8820a14,
title = "Exploring the unique and interactive roles of distress tolerance and negative urgency in obsessions",
abstract = "Recent research has implicated relationships between emotion dysregulation and obsessions. Evidence suggests low distress tolerance and greater tendency to act impulsively in the face of negative affect (or negative urgency) are strongly related to obsessions. The current study sought to examine the unique and interactive roles of distress tolerance and negative urgency in the prediction of obsessions. A large non-clinical sample (N=238) was administered a range of self-report measures. Results revealed that both poor distress tolerance and greater negative urgency were uniquely associated with obsessions but not other obsessive-compulsive symptoms, even when controlling for gender, depression, anxiety, and generalized anxiety disorder symptoms. Additionally, low distress tolerance and high negative urgency interacted with each other in the prediction of greater obsession symptoms. Overall, the findings help clarify the emerging literature linking emotion dysregulation to obsessions.",
keywords = "Distress tolerance, Emotion regulation, Negative urgency, Obsessions, Obsessive-compulsive disorder",
author = "Cougle, {Jesse R.} and Timpano, {Kiara R} and Goetz, {Amy R.}",
year = "2012",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.paid.2011.11.017",
language = "English",
volume = "52",
pages = "515--520",
journal = "Personality and Individual Differences",
issn = "0191-8869",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exploring the unique and interactive roles of distress tolerance and negative urgency in obsessions

AU - Cougle, Jesse R.

AU - Timpano, Kiara R

AU - Goetz, Amy R.

PY - 2012/3/1

Y1 - 2012/3/1

N2 - Recent research has implicated relationships between emotion dysregulation and obsessions. Evidence suggests low distress tolerance and greater tendency to act impulsively in the face of negative affect (or negative urgency) are strongly related to obsessions. The current study sought to examine the unique and interactive roles of distress tolerance and negative urgency in the prediction of obsessions. A large non-clinical sample (N=238) was administered a range of self-report measures. Results revealed that both poor distress tolerance and greater negative urgency were uniquely associated with obsessions but not other obsessive-compulsive symptoms, even when controlling for gender, depression, anxiety, and generalized anxiety disorder symptoms. Additionally, low distress tolerance and high negative urgency interacted with each other in the prediction of greater obsession symptoms. Overall, the findings help clarify the emerging literature linking emotion dysregulation to obsessions.

AB - Recent research has implicated relationships between emotion dysregulation and obsessions. Evidence suggests low distress tolerance and greater tendency to act impulsively in the face of negative affect (or negative urgency) are strongly related to obsessions. The current study sought to examine the unique and interactive roles of distress tolerance and negative urgency in the prediction of obsessions. A large non-clinical sample (N=238) was administered a range of self-report measures. Results revealed that both poor distress tolerance and greater negative urgency were uniquely associated with obsessions but not other obsessive-compulsive symptoms, even when controlling for gender, depression, anxiety, and generalized anxiety disorder symptoms. Additionally, low distress tolerance and high negative urgency interacted with each other in the prediction of greater obsession symptoms. Overall, the findings help clarify the emerging literature linking emotion dysregulation to obsessions.

KW - Distress tolerance

KW - Emotion regulation

KW - Negative urgency

KW - Obsessions

KW - Obsessive-compulsive disorder

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84856209891&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84856209891&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.paid.2011.11.017

DO - 10.1016/j.paid.2011.11.017

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84856209891

VL - 52

SP - 515

EP - 520

JO - Personality and Individual Differences

JF - Personality and Individual Differences

SN - 0191-8869

IS - 4

ER -