Exploration of a Racially Diverse Sample of Nursing Students’ Satisfaction, Self-Efficacy, and Perceptions of Simulation Using Racially Diverse Manikins: A Mixed Methods Pilot Study

Crystal L. Graham, Teresa Atz, Shannon Phillips, Susan Newman, Cynthia Foronda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background This study examined a racially diverse sample of nursing students’ participation in simulation using racially diverse manikins. Method This mixed-methods pilot study utilized pre-post self-efficacy and post satisfaction measures of 16 black and 16 white students. Following completion of the simulation experience, the students participated in single-race focus groups. Results There was a statistically significant difference (p <.001). Conclusion Results provide baseline evidence that race of both students and manikins may be a demographic characteristic variable that influences outcomes in simulation. Further research is needed to determine if race is a variable that can be added to the NLN/Jeffries simulation theory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19-26
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Simulation in Nursing
Volume15
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

Fingerprint

Manikins
Self-efficacy
Nursing
Mixed Methods
Nursing Students
Self Efficacy
Self Concept
self-image
self-efficacy
nursing
Students
simulation
Simulation
student
Focus Groups
Demography
Completion
Baseline
Research
participation

Keywords

  • diversity
  • nursing education
  • nursing students
  • race
  • simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Nursing (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Exploration of a Racially Diverse Sample of Nursing Students’ Satisfaction, Self-Efficacy, and Perceptions of Simulation Using Racially Diverse Manikins : A Mixed Methods Pilot Study. / Graham, Crystal L.; Atz, Teresa; Phillips, Shannon; Newman, Susan; Foronda, Cynthia.

In: Clinical Simulation in Nursing, Vol. 15, 01.02.2018, p. 19-26.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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