Experimental verification of the roles of intrinsic matrix viscoelasticity and tension-compression nonlinearity in the biphasic response of cartilage

Chun-Yuh Huang, Michael A. Soltz, Monika Kopacz, Van C. Mow, Gerard A. Ateshian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

139 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A biphasic-CLE-QLV model proposed in our recent study [2001, J. Biomech. Eng., 123, pp. 10-417] extended the biphasic theory of Mow et al, [1980, J. Biomech. Eng., 102, pp. 73-84] to include both tension-compression nonlinearity and intrinsic viscoelasticity of the cartilage solid matrix by incorporating it with the conewise linear elasticity (CLE) model [1995, J. Elasticity, 37, pp. 1-38] and the quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV) model [Biomechanics: Its foundations and objectives, Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, 1972]. This model demonstrates that a simultaneous prediction of compression and tension experiments of articular cartilage, under stress-relaxation and dynamic loading, can be achieved when properly taking into account both flow-dependent and flow-independent viscoelastic effects, as well as tension-compression nonlinearity, The objective of this study is to directly test this biphasic-CLE-QLV model against experimental data from unconfined compression stress-relaxation tests at slow and fast strain rates as well as dynamic loading. Twelve full-thickness cartilage cylindrical plugs were harvested from six bovine glenohumeral joints and multiple confined and unconfined compression stress-relaxation tests were performed on each specimen. The material properties of specimens were determined by curve-fitting the experimental results from the confined and unconfined compression stress relaxation tests. The findings of this study demonstrate that the biphasic-CLE-QLV model is able to describe the strain-rate-dependent mechanical behaviors of articular cartilage in unconfined compression as attested by good agreements between experimental and theoretical curvefits (r2 =0.966±0.032 for testing at slow strain rate; r2 =0.998±0.002 for testing at fast strain rate) and predictions of the dynamic response (r2 =0.91±0.06). This experimental study also provides supporting evidence for the hypothesis that both tension-compression nonlinearity and intrinsic viscoelasticity of the solid matrix of cartilage are necessary for modeling the transient and equilibrium responses of this tissue in tension and compression. Furthermore, the biphasic-CLE-QLV model can produce better predictions of the dynamic modulus of cartilage in unconfined dynamic compression than the biphasic-CLE and biphasic poroviscoelastic models, indicating that intrinsic viscoelasticity and tension-compression nonlinearity of articular cartilage may play important roles in the load-support mechanism of cartilage under physiologic loading.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)84-93
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Biomechanical Engineering
Volume125
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Elasticity
Viscoelasticity
Cartilage
Linear Models
Stress relaxation
Articular Cartilage
Strain rate
Exercise Test
Compaction
Data Compression
Shoulder Joint
Biomechanics
Biomechanical Phenomena
Curve fitting
Testing
Dynamic response
Materials properties
Tissue

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Biophysics

Cite this

Experimental verification of the roles of intrinsic matrix viscoelasticity and tension-compression nonlinearity in the biphasic response of cartilage. / Huang, Chun-Yuh; Soltz, Michael A.; Kopacz, Monika; Mow, Van C.; Ateshian, Gerard A.

In: Journal of Biomechanical Engineering, Vol. 125, No. 1, 01.02.2003, p. 84-93.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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