Experimental spinal cord injury: Mr correlation to intensity of injury

David B. Hackney, John Ford, Ronald S. Markowitz, Christopher M. Hand, Peter M. Joseph, Perry Black

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study was conducted to determine the association between lesion length measured on MRI and the severity of mechanical injury in a rat model of spinal cord trauma.Materials and Methods: Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a modified Allen weight drop injury and killed 4 h after injury. Their fixed, excised cords were studied with MRI at 1.9 T. Results: There were strong correlations between lesion length on MR images and weight drop height and square root of drop height (r2= 0.55, p <0.0001 and r2= 0.63, p <0.0001, respectively). The lesion length differences were significant versus controls for all drop heights at p values of ≤0.002 and for the 2.5 cm animals versus the 5 and 15 cm animals (p = 0.01 and p = 0.0002, respectively), but the lengths of the 5 vs. 15 cm groups only approached significance (p = 0.06). Conclusion: These results suggest that lesion length determined on MR images is a reliable indicator of the severity of trauma among animals subjected to weight drop injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)357-362
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Computer Assisted Tomography
Volume18
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Spinal Cord Injuries
Wounds and Injuries
Weights and Measures
Sprague Dawley Rats

Keywords

  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Spinal cord wounds and injuries
  • Trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Hackney, D. B., Ford, J., Markowitz, R. S., Hand, C. M., Joseph, P. M., & Black, P. (1994). Experimental spinal cord injury: Mr correlation to intensity of injury. Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography, 18(3), 357-362.

Experimental spinal cord injury : Mr correlation to intensity of injury. / Hackney, David B.; Ford, John; Markowitz, Ronald S.; Hand, Christopher M.; Joseph, Peter M.; Black, Perry.

In: Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography, Vol. 18, No. 3, 1994, p. 357-362.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hackney, DB, Ford, J, Markowitz, RS, Hand, CM, Joseph, PM & Black, P 1994, 'Experimental spinal cord injury: Mr correlation to intensity of injury', Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 357-362.
Hackney DB, Ford J, Markowitz RS, Hand CM, Joseph PM, Black P. Experimental spinal cord injury: Mr correlation to intensity of injury. Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography. 1994;18(3):357-362.
Hackney, David B. ; Ford, John ; Markowitz, Ronald S. ; Hand, Christopher M. ; Joseph, Peter M. ; Black, Perry. / Experimental spinal cord injury : Mr correlation to intensity of injury. In: Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography. 1994 ; Vol. 18, No. 3. pp. 357-362.
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