Exercise participation barrier prevalence and association with exercise participation status in individuals with spinal cord injury

Rachel E Cowan, Mark S Nash, Kimberly D Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study design:Pass-code protected web survey.Objectives:Defining exercise participation barrier prevalence and association with exercise participation status in adults with spinal cord injury (SCI).Setting:World-wide web.Methods:Individuals ≥18 years with ShCI in the United States completed a pass-code protected website survey (N=180). Odds ratios (OR) and OR 95% confidence interval (95% CI) assessed association between barrier presence and exercise participation.Results:No differences existed between exercisers and non-exercisers with respect to age, gender, injury level, injury duration, education level, or employment status. A larger percentage of non-exercisers reported household annual incomes <$7,500. The five most prevalent barriers were not associated with participation status (all OR 95% CI included 1). Low prevalence (≤13%) characterized four of the five barriers most strongly related to being a non-exerciser. Identifying too lazy, too difficult, or no interest as a barrier decreased odds of being an exerciser by 86%, 83%, and 71%, respectively. Not liking exercise decreased the odds of being an exerciser by 90%.Conclusion:Highly prevalent barriers were not associated with exercise participation status, whereas low prevalence barriers were strongly related to being a non-exerciser. Internal barriers had the strongest association with exercise participation status. The possible association between socioeconomic factors and exercise participation may be underappreciated. The most effective interventions to increase exercise participation may be multifocal approaches to enhance internal perceptions about and motivation to exercise, increase knowledge of how and where to exercise, while also reducing program and transportation financial costs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)27-32
Number of pages6
JournalSpinal Cord
Volume51
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

Fingerprint

Spinal Cord Injuries
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Wounds and Injuries
Internet
Motivation
Education
Costs and Cost Analysis
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • barriers
  • exercise
  • physical fitness
  • social participation
  • spinal cord injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

Exercise participation barrier prevalence and association with exercise participation status in individuals with spinal cord injury. / Cowan, Rachel E; Nash, Mark S; Anderson, Kimberly D.

In: Spinal Cord, Vol. 51, No. 1, 01.01.2013, p. 27-32.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{60b5bf139cfd4f77ab3b7cae5c5e4e4b,
title = "Exercise participation barrier prevalence and association with exercise participation status in individuals with spinal cord injury",
abstract = "Study design:Pass-code protected web survey.Objectives:Defining exercise participation barrier prevalence and association with exercise participation status in adults with spinal cord injury (SCI).Setting:World-wide web.Methods:Individuals ≥18 years with ShCI in the United States completed a pass-code protected website survey (N=180). Odds ratios (OR) and OR 95{\%} confidence interval (95{\%} CI) assessed association between barrier presence and exercise participation.Results:No differences existed between exercisers and non-exercisers with respect to age, gender, injury level, injury duration, education level, or employment status. A larger percentage of non-exercisers reported household annual incomes <$7,500. The five most prevalent barriers were not associated with participation status (all OR 95{\%} CI included 1). Low prevalence (≤13{\%}) characterized four of the five barriers most strongly related to being a non-exerciser. Identifying too lazy, too difficult, or no interest as a barrier decreased odds of being an exerciser by 86{\%}, 83{\%}, and 71{\%}, respectively. Not liking exercise decreased the odds of being an exerciser by 90{\%}.Conclusion:Highly prevalent barriers were not associated with exercise participation status, whereas low prevalence barriers were strongly related to being a non-exerciser. Internal barriers had the strongest association with exercise participation status. The possible association between socioeconomic factors and exercise participation may be underappreciated. The most effective interventions to increase exercise participation may be multifocal approaches to enhance internal perceptions about and motivation to exercise, increase knowledge of how and where to exercise, while also reducing program and transportation financial costs.",
keywords = "barriers, exercise, physical fitness, social participation, spinal cord injury",
author = "Cowan, {Rachel E} and Nash, {Mark S} and Anderson, {Kimberly D}",
year = "2013",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/sc.2012.53",
language = "English",
volume = "51",
pages = "27--32",
journal = "Spinal Cord",
issn = "1362-4393",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exercise participation barrier prevalence and association with exercise participation status in individuals with spinal cord injury

AU - Cowan, Rachel E

AU - Nash, Mark S

AU - Anderson, Kimberly D

PY - 2013/1/1

Y1 - 2013/1/1

N2 - Study design:Pass-code protected web survey.Objectives:Defining exercise participation barrier prevalence and association with exercise participation status in adults with spinal cord injury (SCI).Setting:World-wide web.Methods:Individuals ≥18 years with ShCI in the United States completed a pass-code protected website survey (N=180). Odds ratios (OR) and OR 95% confidence interval (95% CI) assessed association between barrier presence and exercise participation.Results:No differences existed between exercisers and non-exercisers with respect to age, gender, injury level, injury duration, education level, or employment status. A larger percentage of non-exercisers reported household annual incomes <$7,500. The five most prevalent barriers were not associated with participation status (all OR 95% CI included 1). Low prevalence (≤13%) characterized four of the five barriers most strongly related to being a non-exerciser. Identifying too lazy, too difficult, or no interest as a barrier decreased odds of being an exerciser by 86%, 83%, and 71%, respectively. Not liking exercise decreased the odds of being an exerciser by 90%.Conclusion:Highly prevalent barriers were not associated with exercise participation status, whereas low prevalence barriers were strongly related to being a non-exerciser. Internal barriers had the strongest association with exercise participation status. The possible association between socioeconomic factors and exercise participation may be underappreciated. The most effective interventions to increase exercise participation may be multifocal approaches to enhance internal perceptions about and motivation to exercise, increase knowledge of how and where to exercise, while also reducing program and transportation financial costs.

AB - Study design:Pass-code protected web survey.Objectives:Defining exercise participation barrier prevalence and association with exercise participation status in adults with spinal cord injury (SCI).Setting:World-wide web.Methods:Individuals ≥18 years with ShCI in the United States completed a pass-code protected website survey (N=180). Odds ratios (OR) and OR 95% confidence interval (95% CI) assessed association between barrier presence and exercise participation.Results:No differences existed between exercisers and non-exercisers with respect to age, gender, injury level, injury duration, education level, or employment status. A larger percentage of non-exercisers reported household annual incomes <$7,500. The five most prevalent barriers were not associated with participation status (all OR 95% CI included 1). Low prevalence (≤13%) characterized four of the five barriers most strongly related to being a non-exerciser. Identifying too lazy, too difficult, or no interest as a barrier decreased odds of being an exerciser by 86%, 83%, and 71%, respectively. Not liking exercise decreased the odds of being an exerciser by 90%.Conclusion:Highly prevalent barriers were not associated with exercise participation status, whereas low prevalence barriers were strongly related to being a non-exerciser. Internal barriers had the strongest association with exercise participation status. The possible association between socioeconomic factors and exercise participation may be underappreciated. The most effective interventions to increase exercise participation may be multifocal approaches to enhance internal perceptions about and motivation to exercise, increase knowledge of how and where to exercise, while also reducing program and transportation financial costs.

KW - barriers

KW - exercise

KW - physical fitness

KW - social participation

KW - spinal cord injury

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84872060262&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84872060262&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/sc.2012.53

DO - 10.1038/sc.2012.53

M3 - Article

C2 - 22584283

AN - SCOPUS:84872060262

VL - 51

SP - 27

EP - 32

JO - Spinal Cord

JF - Spinal Cord

SN - 1362-4393

IS - 1

ER -