Examining discrimination and familism values as longitudinal predictors of prosocial behaviors among recent immigrant adolescents

Alexandra N. Davis, Meredith McGinley, Gustavo Carlo, Seth J. Schwartz, Jennifer B. Unger, Sabrina E.Des Rosiers, Lourdes Baezconde-Garbanati, Elma I. Lorenzo-Blanco, Daniel Soto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The current study was designed to address gaps in the existing literature by examining the role of discrimination and familism values as predictors of multiple forms of prosocial behaviors across time in a sample of recent immigrant Latino/a adolescents. Participants were 302 recent immigrant Latino/a adolescents (53.3% male; average age 14.51 years, range = 13–17). Data were collected from adolescents in two U.S. cities: Los Angeles (n = 150) and Miami (n = 152). Adolescents completed measures of their own discrimination experiences, familism values, and tendency to engage in six forms of prosocial behaviors. Results indicated generally positive links between familism values and prosocial behaviors. Discrimination also positively predicted public prosocial behaviors and negatively predicted altruistic prosocial behaviors. We discuss the development of cultural processes and perceptions of discrimination experiences, and how these factors predict helping behaviors among immigrant adolescents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)317-326
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Behavioral Development
Volume45
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Discrimination
  • Latino/a adolescents
  • familism
  • prosocial behaviors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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