Evidence for an exaggerated postprandial lipemia in chronic paraplegia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/Objective: Excessive delay in triglyceride (TG) metabolism after ingestion of dietary fat represents a significant cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. The objective of this study was to compare the postprandial lipemic responses of individuals with paraplegia with those of healthy nondisabled individuals. Methods: The ability of 3 recreationally active individuals with paraplegia having normal fasting TG (mean = 103 mg/dL) to metabolize TG after ingestion of a high-fat test meal was compared with a previously published cohort of 21 recreationally active individuals without paraplegia (TG mean = 86 mg/dL) who underwent identical testing. The subjects with paraplegia had venous blood taken under fasting conditions, and then ingested a milkshake containing premium ice cream blended with heavy whipping cream (∼92% of calories from fat). Additional blood samples were obtained at 2, 4, and 6 hours after ingestion. The area under the curve (AUC) for TG clearance for both subject groups was measured with an area planimeter. Results: TG uptake for both groups was almost identical for the first 2 hours after ingestion. At 4 and 6 hours after ingestion, the TG levels were 50 and 35 mg/dL higher, respectively, in subjects with paraplegia than in nondisabled subjects. When corrected for small baseline differences in TG concentrations (16 mg/dL), the AUC was 46.5% greater for the group with paraplegia than in the nondisabled group. A near mirror association across time was observed between postprandial serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and TG levels in subjects with paraplegia. Conclusion: This case series finds an exaggerated postprandial lipemia (PPL) in persons with paraplegia with normal fasting TGs. This finding is the first evidence, in a small population, of an unreported potential CVD risk in persons with paraplegia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)320-325
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Spinal Cord Medicine
Volume28
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005

Fingerprint

Paraplegia
Hyperlipidemias
Triglycerides
Eating
Fasting
Area Under Curve
Cardiovascular Diseases
Fats
Ice Cream
Aptitude
Dietary Fats
HDL Cholesterol
Meals

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Lipids
  • Paraplegia
  • Risk factors
  • Spinal cord injuries
  • Triglyceride metabolism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Evidence for an exaggerated postprandial lipemia in chronic paraplegia. / Nash, Mark S; DeGroot, Joris; Martinez-Arizala, Alberto; Mendez, Armando J.

In: Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine, Vol. 28, No. 4, 01.12.2005, p. 320-325.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Evidence for an exaggerated postprandial lipemia in chronic paraplegia",
abstract = "Background/Objective: Excessive delay in triglyceride (TG) metabolism after ingestion of dietary fat represents a significant cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. The objective of this study was to compare the postprandial lipemic responses of individuals with paraplegia with those of healthy nondisabled individuals. Methods: The ability of 3 recreationally active individuals with paraplegia having normal fasting TG (mean = 103 mg/dL) to metabolize TG after ingestion of a high-fat test meal was compared with a previously published cohort of 21 recreationally active individuals without paraplegia (TG mean = 86 mg/dL) who underwent identical testing. The subjects with paraplegia had venous blood taken under fasting conditions, and then ingested a milkshake containing premium ice cream blended with heavy whipping cream (∼92{\%} of calories from fat). Additional blood samples were obtained at 2, 4, and 6 hours after ingestion. The area under the curve (AUC) for TG clearance for both subject groups was measured with an area planimeter. Results: TG uptake for both groups was almost identical for the first 2 hours after ingestion. At 4 and 6 hours after ingestion, the TG levels were 50 and 35 mg/dL higher, respectively, in subjects with paraplegia than in nondisabled subjects. When corrected for small baseline differences in TG concentrations (16 mg/dL), the AUC was 46.5{\%} greater for the group with paraplegia than in the nondisabled group. A near mirror association across time was observed between postprandial serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and TG levels in subjects with paraplegia. Conclusion: This case series finds an exaggerated postprandial lipemia (PPL) in persons with paraplegia with normal fasting TGs. This finding is the first evidence, in a small population, of an unreported potential CVD risk in persons with paraplegia.",
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