Event-based prospective memory performance during subacute recovery following moderate to severe traumatic brain injury in children: Effects of monetary incentives

Stephen R. McCauley, Claudia Pedroza, Sandra B. Chapman, Lori G. Cook, Gillian Hotz, Ana C. Vásquez, Harvey S. Levin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

There are very few studies investigating remediation of event-based prospective memory (EB-PM) impairments following traumatic brain injury (TBI). To address this, we used 2 levels of motivational enhancement (dollars vs. pennies) to improve EB-PM in children with moderate to severe TBI in the subacute recovery phase. Children with orthopedic injuries (OI; n = 61), moderate (n = 28), or severe (n = 30) TBI were compared. Significant effects included Group × Motivation Condition (F(2, 115) = 3.73, p <.03). The OI (p <.002) and moderate TBI (p <.03) groups performed significantly better under the high- versus low-incentive condition; however, the severe TBI group failed to demonstrate improvement (p =.38). EB-PM performance was better in adolescents compared to younger children (p <.02). These results suggest that EB-PM can be significantly improved in the subacute phase with this level of monetary incentives in children with moderate, but not severe, TBI. Other strategies to improve EB-PM in these children at a similar point in recovery remain to be identified and evaluated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)335-341
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2010

Keywords

  • Event-based prospective memory
  • Incentive
  • Memory rehabilitation
  • Motivation
  • Pediatrics
  • Traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Neuroscience(all)

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