Evaluation of the value of frozen tissue section used as "gold standard" for immunohistochemistry

Shan Rong Shi, Cheng Liu, Llana Pootrakul, Laurie Tang, Andrew Young, Ryan Chen, Richard J Cote, Clive R. Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To examine the use of acetone- or ethanol-fixed frozen tissue sections as the "gold standard" for immunohistochemical analysis, we evaluated frozen sections with various conditions of fixation and antigen retrieval (AR). Fresh human tissues were frozen in OCT. An adjacent tissue block was fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin (NBF) and paraffin embedded (FFPE). Frozen sections were fixed by 6 protocols: acetone, ethanol, NBF (2 durations), and NBF + calcium chloride (2 durations). AR was used for all NBF-fixed sections. More than half of the antibodies (16/26 [62%]) showed immunohistochemical results indistinguishable between acetone- and NBF-fixed sections; 8 (31%) showed better immunohistochemical signals following NBF and AR; 2 gave better immunohistochemical results for acetone-fixed sections. Most cytoplasmic proteins (10/13) showed comparable immunohistochemical signals between acetone- and NBF-fixed sections. For nuclear proteins, NBF-fixed sections gave better immunohistochemical signals than did acetone-fixed sections. In most cases, NBF yielded stronger signals with less background and better morphology. The data do not support the use of acetone-fixed frozen tissue sections as the gold standard for immunohistochemical analysis. In evaluating new antibodies, a combination of acetone- and NBF-fixed frozen sections should be used, although in practice, FFPE tissue sections may serve as the standard for most antigens for immunohistochemical analysis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)358-366
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Pathology
Volume129
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Frozen Sections
Formaldehyde
Acetone
Immunohistochemistry
Antigens
Ethanol
Calcium Chloride
Antibodies
Nuclear Proteins
Paraffin

Keywords

  • Antigen retrieval
  • Formalin fixation
  • Frozen tissue section
  • Immunohistochemistry
  • Paraffin embedding

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Evaluation of the value of frozen tissue section used as "gold standard" for immunohistochemistry. / Shi, Shan Rong; Liu, Cheng; Pootrakul, Llana; Tang, Laurie; Young, Andrew; Chen, Ryan; Cote, Richard J; Taylor, Clive R.

In: American Journal of Clinical Pathology, Vol. 129, No. 3, 01.03.2008, p. 358-366.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shi, Shan Rong ; Liu, Cheng ; Pootrakul, Llana ; Tang, Laurie ; Young, Andrew ; Chen, Ryan ; Cote, Richard J ; Taylor, Clive R. / Evaluation of the value of frozen tissue section used as "gold standard" for immunohistochemistry. In: American Journal of Clinical Pathology. 2008 ; Vol. 129, No. 3. pp. 358-366.
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