Evaluation of the human gene encoding recoverin in patients with retinitis pigmentosa or an allied disease

Amy H. Parminder, Akira Murakami, George Inana, Eliot L. Berson, Thaddeus P. Dryja

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose. To determine whether defects in the human recoverin gene cause retinitis pigmentosa (RP) or an allied disease such as Usher syndrome, Leber congenital amaurosis, or the Bardet-Biedl syndrome. Methods. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and direct genomic sequencing techniques were used to screen 596 unrelated patients, comprising 167 patients with dominant RP, 168 with recessive RP, and 261 with an allied disease. Results. Four sequence variants were discovered. The first was a missense change (Ala200Thr) found in one family with autosomal dominant RP and in one family with autosomal recessive RP; it did not segregate with disease. The second was a silent, single-base variation affecting codon Ser24 with a minor allele frequency of approximately 0.5%. The third was a silent, single-base variation affecting codon VA1122. The fourth was a single-nucleotide substitution in intron 2, 11 bp upstream of exon 3. Conclusions. The authors found no evidence that mutations in the recoverin gene are a cause of RP or another of the hereditary retinal diseases studied. The human phenotype associated with mutations of the recoverin gene remains unknown.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)704-709
Number of pages6
JournalInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Volume38
Issue number3
StatePublished - Apr 11 1997

Keywords

  • Bardet-Biedl syndrome
  • Leber congenital amaurosis
  • recoverin
  • retinitis pigmentosa
  • Usher syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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