Evaluation of the B-Smart manometer and the CompuFlo computerized injection pump technology for accurate needle-tip injection pressure measurement during peripheral nerve blockade

Robyn S. Weisman, Nirav P. Bhavsar, Kathleen A. Schuster, Ralf E Gebhard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The exact mechanism of peripheral nerve blocks causing/leading to nerve injury remains controversial. Evidence from animal experiments suggests that intrafascicular injection resulting in high injection pressure has the potential to rupture nerve fascicles and may consequently cause permanent nerve injury and neurological deficits. The B-Smart (BS) in-line manometer and the CompuFlo (CF) computerized injection pump technology are two modalities used for monitoring pressure during regional anesthesia. This study sought to explore the accuracy of these two technologies in measuring needle-tip pressures in a simulated environment. METHODS: In seven simulated needle-syringe combinations, the BS and the CF devices were connected in series through a closed system and attached to a digital manometer at the tip of various needles. The pressures were evaluated in three trials per needle-syringe combination. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy (F1 Score) were determined for each needle type and overall. RESULTS: For pressures ≥15 psi and ≥20 psi, respectively, the CF device demonstrated a sensitivity of 100%, 100%; specificity of 96%, 98%; positive predictive value 93%, 93%; and negative predictive value of 100%, 100%. The BS device demonstrated a sensitivity of 60%, 100%; specificity of 99%, 95%; positive predictive value of 96%, 85%; and negative predictive value of 85%, 100%. Accuracy, as measured by the F1 Score, for detecting a pressure of ≥15 psi was 0.96 for the CF and 0.74 for the BS. CONCLUSIONS: Future research is needed to explore in-vivo performance and evaluate whether either of these devices can impact on clinical outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)86-90
Number of pages5
JournalRegional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine
Volume44
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Nerve Block
Peripheral Nerves
Needles
Technology
Pressure
Injections
Equipment and Supplies
Syringes
Conduction Anesthesia
Wounds and Injuries
Rupture
Sensitivity and Specificity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Evaluation of the B-Smart manometer and the CompuFlo computerized injection pump technology for accurate needle-tip injection pressure measurement during peripheral nerve blockade. / Weisman, Robyn S.; Bhavsar, Nirav P.; Schuster, Kathleen A.; Gebhard, Ralf E.

In: Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, Vol. 44, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 86-90.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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