Evaluation of a training program for persons with SCI paraplegia using the Parastep®1 ambulation system: Part 2. Effects on physiological responses to peak arm ergometry

Patrick L. Jacobs, Mark S Nash, K. John Klose, Rosalind S. Guest, Belinda M. Needham-Shropshire, Barth A Green

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the task-nonspecific effects of functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS)-assisted ambulation training on the physiological responses of persons with paraplegia to upper extremity exercise challenge. Design: Before-after trial. Setting: Human spinal cord injury (SCI) applied research laboratory. Participants: Twelve men and three women with motor- and sensory-complete thoracic-level SCI (T4-T11), mean age 28.2 ± 6.8yrs (range, 21.1 to 45.2yrs), mean injury duration 3.7 ± 3.0yrs (range, 7 to 8.8yrs). Intervention: Thirty-two sessions of FNS ambulation training using a commercial six-channel system (Parastep® 1). This system is composed of a microprocessor-controlled electrical stimulation unit and a walking frame outfitted with finger switches that allow the user to independently control the system and stimulation parameters. Outcome Measures: Peak and subpeak physiological responses to arm ergometry testing and upper extremity strength measures, obtained before and after the FNS ambulation training. Results: Statistically significant increases in peak values for time to fatigue, peak power output, and peak V̇O2 (all p < .001). Heart rate was significantly lower throughout subpeak levels of arm ergometry after the ambulation training (p < .05). Values of upper extremity strength were not significantly altered after training. Conclusions: FNS ambulation by persons with SCI paraplegia results in task-nonspecific training adaptations. Central cardiovascular adaptations were indicated as the primary source of these beneficial alterations in exercise responses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)794-798
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume78
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 1997

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Ergometry
Paraplegia
Spinal Cord Injuries
Walking
Arm
Education
Upper Extremity
Exercise
Microcomputers
Electric Stimulation
Fingers
Fatigue
Thorax
Heart Rate
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Wounds and Injuries
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Evaluation of a training program for persons with SCI paraplegia using the Parastep®1 ambulation system : Part 2. Effects on physiological responses to peak arm ergometry. / Jacobs, Patrick L.; Nash, Mark S; Klose, K. John; Guest, Rosalind S.; Needham-Shropshire, Belinda M.; Green, Barth A.

In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vol. 78, No. 8, 01.08.1997, p. 794-798.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: To examine the task-nonspecific effects of functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS)-assisted ambulation training on the physiological responses of persons with paraplegia to upper extremity exercise challenge. Design: Before-after trial. Setting: Human spinal cord injury (SCI) applied research laboratory. Participants: Twelve men and three women with motor- and sensory-complete thoracic-level SCI (T4-T11), mean age 28.2 ± 6.8yrs (range, 21.1 to 45.2yrs), mean injury duration 3.7 ± 3.0yrs (range, 7 to 8.8yrs). Intervention: Thirty-two sessions of FNS ambulation training using a commercial six-channel system (Parastep{\circledR} 1). This system is composed of a microprocessor-controlled electrical stimulation unit and a walking frame outfitted with finger switches that allow the user to independently control the system and stimulation parameters. Outcome Measures: Peak and subpeak physiological responses to arm ergometry testing and upper extremity strength measures, obtained before and after the FNS ambulation training. Results: Statistically significant increases in peak values for time to fatigue, peak power output, and peak V̇O2 (all p < .001). Heart rate was significantly lower throughout subpeak levels of arm ergometry after the ambulation training (p < .05). Values of upper extremity strength were not significantly altered after training. Conclusions: FNS ambulation by persons with SCI paraplegia results in task-nonspecific training adaptations. Central cardiovascular adaptations were indicated as the primary source of these beneficial alterations in exercise responses.",
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