Evaluating the effects of coping style on allostatic load, by sex: The Jackson heart study, 2000-2004

Cristina A. Fernandez, Eric B. Loucks, Kristopher Arheart, DeMarc A. Hickson, Robert Kohn, Stephen L. Buka, Annie Gjelsvik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of this study was to examine the cross-sectional association between coping styles and allostatic load among African American adults in the Jackson Heart Study (2000-2004). Coping styles were assessed using the Coping Strategies Inventory-Short Form; allostatic load was measured by using 9 biomarkers standardized into z-scores. Sex-stratified multivariable linear regressions indicated that females who used disengagement coping styles had significantly higher allostatic load scores (β = 0.016; 95% CI, 0.001-0.032); no such associations were found in males. Future longitudinal investigations should examine why disengagement coping style is linked to increased allostatic load to better inform effective interventions and reduce health disparities among African American women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberE165
JournalPreventing chronic disease
Volume12
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Fernandez, C. A., Loucks, E. B., Arheart, K., Hickson, D. A., Kohn, R., Buka, S. L., & Gjelsvik, A. (2015). Evaluating the effects of coping style on allostatic load, by sex: The Jackson heart study, 2000-2004. Preventing chronic disease, 12(10), [E165]. https://doi.org/10.5888/pcd12.150166