Evaluating health information technology: Provider satisfaction with an HIV-specific, electronic clinical management and reporting system

Manya Magnus, Jane Herwehe, Laura Andrews, Laura Gibson, Nathan Daigrepont, Jordana M. De Leon, Newton E. Hyslop, Steven Stryon, Ronald Wilcox, Michael Kaiser, Michael K. Butler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Health information technology (HIT) offers the potential to improve care for persons living with HIV. Provider satisfaction with HIT is essential to realize benefits, yet its evaluation presents challenges. An HIV-specific, electronic clinical management and reporting system was implemented in Louisiana's eight HIV clinics, serving over 7500. A serial cross-sectional survey was administered at three points between April 2002 and July 2005; qualitative methods were used to augment quantitative. Multivariable methods were used to characterize provider satisfaction. The majority of the sample (n = 196; T1 = 105; T2 = 46; T3 = 45) was female (80.0%), between ages of 25 and 50 years (68.3%), frequent providers at that clinic (53.7% more than 4 days per week), and had been at the same clinic for a year or more (85.0%). Improvements in satisfaction were observed in patient tracking (p < 0.05), distribution of educational materials (p < 0.04), and belief that electronic systems improve care (p < 0.05). Provider self-reports of time to complete critical functions decreased for all tasks, two significantly so. Time (in minutes) to find current CD4 count decreased at each time point (mean 3.9 [standard deviation {SD} 5.8], 2.9 [2.3], 2.1 [2.6], p > 0.05), current viral load decreased at each time point (mean 4.0 [SD 5.6], 2.9 [2.5], 1.8 [2.6], p = 0.08], current antiretroviral status decreased at each time point (mean 3.9 [SD 4.7], 2.9 [3.7], 1.5 [1.1], p < 0.04), history of antiretroviral use decreased at each time point (mean 15.1 [SD 21.9], 6.0 [5.4], 5.4 [7.2], p < 0.04]. Time savings were realized, averaging 16.1 minutes per visit (p < 0.04). Providers were satisfied with HIT in multiple domains, and significant time savings were realized.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)85-91
Number of pages7
JournalAIDS patient care and STDs
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Evaluating health information technology: Provider satisfaction with an HIV-specific, electronic clinical management and reporting system'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Magnus, M., Herwehe, J., Andrews, L., Gibson, L., Daigrepont, N., De Leon, J. M., Hyslop, N. E., Stryon, S., Wilcox, R., Kaiser, M., & Butler, M. K. (2009). Evaluating health information technology: Provider satisfaction with an HIV-specific, electronic clinical management and reporting system. AIDS patient care and STDs, 23(2), 85-91. https://doi.org/10.1089/apc.2008.0053