Evaluating a novel intervention to reduce trauma symptoms and sexual risk taking: qualitative exit interviews with sexual minority men with childhood sexual abuse

S. Wade Taylor, Brett M. Goshe, Samantha M. Marquez, Steven A. Safren, Conall O’Cleirigh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) continues to affect sexual minority men (SMM) at disproportionate levels and contributes to multiple negative health outcomes, including sexual-risk taking and HIV acquisition. This paper presents qualitative evaluative feedback from SMM (N = 9) who participated in a 10-session Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-Trauma and Sexual Health (CBT-TSH) intervention to reduce CSA-related posttraumatic stress reaction and distress. The treatment was designed to increase accurate sexual risk appraisals and to improve self-care health behaviors related to HIV/STI acquisition. The researchers identified four emerging themes: (1) motivation to participate, (2) response to cognitive therapy, (3) process of change, and (4) considerations for intervention improvement. These qualitative findings provide useful feedback on the acceptability of an innovative program that integrates CBT for trauma related to CSA with sexual risk-reduction counseling.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)454-464
Number of pages11
JournalPsychology, Health and Medicine
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 21 2018

Keywords

  • HIV prevention
  • MSM
  • Sexual minority men
  • childhood sexual abuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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