Evaluating a Culturally Tailored HIV Risk Reduction Intervention Among Latina Immigrants in the Farmworker Community

Mariana Sanchez, Patria Rojas, Tan Li, Gira Ravelo, Elena Cyrus, Weize Wang, Mariano Kanamori, Nilda P. Peragallo, Mario R. De La Rosa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Latina immigrants in the farmworker community are a vulnerable and understudied population at risk of acquiring HIV. Employing a CBPR framework, this pilot study was the first to evaluate the efficacy of SEPA, a CDC evidenced-based and culturally tailored HIV risk reduction intervention on a cohort of N = 110 predominantly undocumented Latina immigrants in a farmworker community. Findings revealed SEPA was effective in increasing HIV knowledge and decreasing HIV risk behaviors. However, no changes in self-efficacy were found in the present sample. We posit specific socio-cultural and structural barriers specific to the farmworker community not targeted in the original intervention may have hindered the program's capacity to influence changes in self-efficacy among this less acculturated population. Possible socio-cultural adaptations of the intervention to the target population and policy implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)245-262
Number of pages18
JournalWorld Medical and Health Policy
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

Keywords

  • HIV/AIDS
  • Hispanic
  • Latino/a
  • farmworker
  • immigrant
  • migrant worker
  • seasonal workers
  • women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

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  • Cite this

    Sanchez, M., Rojas, P., Li, T., Ravelo, G., Cyrus, E., Wang, W., Kanamori, M., Peragallo, N. P., & De La Rosa, M. R. (2016). Evaluating a Culturally Tailored HIV Risk Reduction Intervention Among Latina Immigrants in the Farmworker Community. World Medical and Health Policy, 8(3), 245-262. https://doi.org/10.1002/wmh3.193