Ethnicity Influences Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)-Associated Colon Cancer: A Cross-sectional Analysis of Dysplasia Prevalence and Risk Factors in Hispanics and Non-Hispanic Whites with IBD

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Abstract

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an emerging disease in Hispanics. In this study, we examine the prevalence of IBD-related colon dysplasia (IBD-dys) in Hispanics versus non-Hispanic whites (NHWs) and compare differences in established clinical and environmental risk factors. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional analysis on adult Hispanics and NHWs with IBD who met criteria for colorectal cancer surveillance and were followed at our center between 2008 and 2018. Clinical variables and IBD phenotype were recorded. Lifestyle IBD-dys risk factors were examined, including smoking and lack of physical activity. Using multivariable regression, we compared the prevalence of IBD-dys in Hispanics versus NHW, using relevant covariates. Receiver operating characteristic and area under the curve were performed to find the best fitting model. Results: A total of 445 IBD patients were included (148 Hispanics and 297 NHWs). IBD phenotype was similar between groups, except that Hispanics had shorter disease duration, a lower frequency of Crohn's disease-related complications, and lower reported use of steroids. Frequency of surveillance colonoscopies was similar between Hispanics and NHW. There were no differences in median body mass index between Hispanics and NHW [26.5 (IQR 6.0) vs 25.0 (IQR 6.0), P = 0.40]. Hispanics were less likely than NHW to consume alcohol but smoking history was similar between groups. Three out of 148 Hispanic patients had IBD-dys (2.02%) compared to 29 out of 297 NHWs (9.76%). Adjusting for disease duration, primary sclerosing cholangitis, family history of colon cancer, and smoking, Hispanics had a lower prevalence of IBD-dys compared to NHW [ORadjusted = 0.207 (95% CI 0.046-0.938), P = 0.008]. Conclusions: Hispanics with IBD undergoing surveillance had a lower prevalence of IBD-dys than their NHW counterparts, despite similar risk factors. Future studies should examine dietary and microbial factors that may explain differences in risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberotab016
JournalCrohn's and Colitis 360
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2021

Keywords

  • colon cancer
  • colon dysplasia
  • Hispanics
  • inflammatory bowel disease
  • minorities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

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