Ethnicity, Emotional Distress, Stress-Related Disruption, and Coping among HIV Seropositive Gay Males

Alicia Ceballos-Capitaine, Jose Szapocznik, Nancy T. Blaney, Robert O. Morgan, Carrie Millon, Carl Eisdorfer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Differences in psychosocial factors that impact immune function and which, therefore, are relevant to HIV infection have been reported between Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites in the cross-cultural literature. To determine whether there were differences between Hispanic and non-Hispanic white HIV-seropositive homosexual males on life stressors, coping style, social support, and emotional distress, a sample (Hispanics = 27, non-Hispanic whites = 49) of participants in a five-year longitudinal study of HIV disease progression was assessed on relevant measures. Hispanics in this sample were not found to evidence psychosocial deficits as compared to non-Hispanic whites. Although not more stressed overall, Hispanics reportedhigher severity of stress on daily interactions related to their homosexual lifestyle than did their non-Hispanic white counterparts. Level ofacculturation isproposedas apossible explanation forthe striking similarities along most other psychosocial parameters.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)135-152
Number of pages18
JournalHispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Cultural Studies
  • Anthropology

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