Ethnic Identity and Acculturation in Hispanic Early Adolescents: Mediated Relationships to Academic Grades, Prosocial Behaviors, and Externalizing Symptoms

Seth J. Schwartz, Byron L. Zamboanga, Lorna Hernandez Jarvis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

161 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined acculturative stress and self-esteem as mediators of the association of ethnic identity and acculturation with psychosocial outcomes. The study sample consisted of 347 Hispanic adolescents in a "new" immigrant-receiving community in the Midwest. The authors expected acculturation to influence psychosocial adjustment through acculturative stress and ethnic identity to influence psychosocial adjustment through self-esteem. Results indicated that relationships of ethnic identity to academic grades and to externalizing symptoms were mediated by self-esteem and that both U.S. and Hispanic acculturation orientations were directly associated with prosocial behavior. The relationships of U.S. cultural orientation to academic grades and to behavior problems were mediated through acculturative stress and self-esteem. Implications of these findings for the study of Hispanics in more monocultural receiving communities are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)364-373
Number of pages10
JournalCultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2007

Keywords

  • acculturation
  • acculturative stress
  • ethnic identity
  • Hispanic
  • psychosocial adjustment
  • self-esteem

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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