Ethnic disparity in skin complications following bone-anchored hearing aid implantation

Daniel M. Zeitler, Bjorn S. Herman, Hillary A Snapp, Fred F Telischi, Simon I Angeli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Sound processor loading after implantation of a bone-anchored hearing aid is often delayed by skin-site complications. This study examined the frequency of skin-site complications in various ethnic groups and determined factors that may lead to higher rates of skin-site complications resulting in delayed processor loading. Methods: Adult, English-speaking patients who underwent implantation of a bone-anchored hearing aid between 2007 and 2010 were reviewed. Demographic data including ethnicity, tobacco use, diabetes mellitus, immunosuppression, and long-term steroid use were determined. Major and minor skin-site complications and the time to processor loading were recorded. Results: The mean time to processor loading was 9.5 weeks, and the mean follow-up time was 23 months. There were no cases of osseointegration failure. African American patients had a significantly higher rate of major skin-site complications (p < 0.005) and a longer time to processor loading (mean, 17.6 weeks; p < 0.05) than the other ethnic groups. There was no significant difference in minor skin complication rates. There was no correlation between diabetes mellitus, longterm immunosuppression, or tobacco use and skin-site complications. Conclusions: Skin complications can delay processor loading following implantation of a bone-anchored hearing aid. There is a higher rate of major skin-site complications in African American patients, and these often delay processor loading. The risk of skin-site complications is not correlated with smoking, diabetes mellitus, or immunosuppression. An increased risk of skin-site complications is an important consideration for preoperative counseling.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)549-554
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology
Volume121
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 1 2012

Fingerprint

Hearing Aids
Bone and Bones
Skin
Immunosuppression
Diabetes Mellitus
Tobacco Use
Ethnic Groups
African Americans
Osseointegration
Counseling
Smoking
Steroids
Demography

Keywords

  • Bone-anchored hearing aid
  • Ethnicity
  • Hearing loss
  • Immunosuppression
  • Keloid
  • Postoperative complication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Ethnic disparity in skin complications following bone-anchored hearing aid implantation. / Zeitler, Daniel M.; Herman, Bjorn S.; Snapp, Hillary A; Telischi, Fred F; Angeli, Simon I.

In: Annals of Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology, Vol. 121, No. 8, 01.08.2012, p. 549-554.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objectives: Sound processor loading after implantation of a bone-anchored hearing aid is often delayed by skin-site complications. This study examined the frequency of skin-site complications in various ethnic groups and determined factors that may lead to higher rates of skin-site complications resulting in delayed processor loading. Methods: Adult, English-speaking patients who underwent implantation of a bone-anchored hearing aid between 2007 and 2010 were reviewed. Demographic data including ethnicity, tobacco use, diabetes mellitus, immunosuppression, and long-term steroid use were determined. Major and minor skin-site complications and the time to processor loading were recorded. Results: The mean time to processor loading was 9.5 weeks, and the mean follow-up time was 23 months. There were no cases of osseointegration failure. African American patients had a significantly higher rate of major skin-site complications (p < 0.005) and a longer time to processor loading (mean, 17.6 weeks; p < 0.05) than the other ethnic groups. There was no significant difference in minor skin complication rates. There was no correlation between diabetes mellitus, longterm immunosuppression, or tobacco use and skin-site complications. Conclusions: Skin complications can delay processor loading following implantation of a bone-anchored hearing aid. There is a higher rate of major skin-site complications in African American patients, and these often delay processor loading. The risk of skin-site complications is not correlated with smoking, diabetes mellitus, or immunosuppression. An increased risk of skin-site complications is an important consideration for preoperative counseling.",
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N2 - Objectives: Sound processor loading after implantation of a bone-anchored hearing aid is often delayed by skin-site complications. This study examined the frequency of skin-site complications in various ethnic groups and determined factors that may lead to higher rates of skin-site complications resulting in delayed processor loading. Methods: Adult, English-speaking patients who underwent implantation of a bone-anchored hearing aid between 2007 and 2010 were reviewed. Demographic data including ethnicity, tobacco use, diabetes mellitus, immunosuppression, and long-term steroid use were determined. Major and minor skin-site complications and the time to processor loading were recorded. Results: The mean time to processor loading was 9.5 weeks, and the mean follow-up time was 23 months. There were no cases of osseointegration failure. African American patients had a significantly higher rate of major skin-site complications (p < 0.005) and a longer time to processor loading (mean, 17.6 weeks; p < 0.05) than the other ethnic groups. There was no significant difference in minor skin complication rates. There was no correlation between diabetes mellitus, longterm immunosuppression, or tobacco use and skin-site complications. Conclusions: Skin complications can delay processor loading following implantation of a bone-anchored hearing aid. There is a higher rate of major skin-site complications in African American patients, and these often delay processor loading. The risk of skin-site complications is not correlated with smoking, diabetes mellitus, or immunosuppression. An increased risk of skin-site complications is an important consideration for preoperative counseling.

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