Ethics management in municipal governments and large firms: Exploring Similarities and Differences

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study compares the ethics management strategies of large cities and firms with the purpose of examining whether public-private sector differences that have been hypothesized in the literature are reflected in ethics management practices. The findings suggest that differences between the public and private sectors are minimal; however, cities use more regulatory-based strategies, and large firms use code-based strategies. Moral leadership by senior managers is the most important strategy for improving ethics in both sectors. Concerns about litigation, public complaints, and promoting good public relations are important reasons driving concern with ethics in both cities and firms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)185-203
Number of pages19
JournalAdministration and Society
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994

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moral philosophy
firm
management
private sector
large city
complaint
public sector
manager
leadership
Municipal government
Large firms
Ethics management
Public and private sector
Litigation
Complaints
Senior managers
Private sector
Public relations
Management strategy
Management practices

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Marketing
  • Public Administration

Cite this

Ethics management in municipal governments and large firms : Exploring Similarities and Differences. / Berman, Evan; West, Jonathan; Cava, Anita.

In: Administration and Society, Vol. 26, No. 2, 1994, p. 185-203.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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