Estrogen receptor status: an important variable in predicting response to endocrine therapy in metastatic breast cancer

Joseph C. Allegra, Marc E Lippman, E. Brad Thompson, Richard Simon, Audrey Barlock, Linda Green, Karen K. Huff, Hoan M Y T Do, Susan C. Aitken, Robert Warren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

113 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The influence of estrogen receptor status on response rate to endocrine therapy in 85 patients with metastatic breast cancer was determined in a retrospective study. The specific purpose of this study was to assess the role of estrogen receptor determinations in the light of a host of clinical variables known or suspected to influence response rates to endocrine therapy. Thirty-four of 52 patients whose tumors contained significant amounts of estrogen receptor (>10 fmole/mg cytoplasmic protein) had objective responses to endocrine therapy while only 3 33 patients whose tumors did not possess estrogen receptor (< 10 fmole/mg cytoplasmic protein) responded (P < 0.0001). A quantitative relationship was found between the amount of estrogen receptor and response rate. The quantity of estrogen receptor was not associated with the duration of response. The predictive value of the estrogen receptor assay was not associated with the receptor dissociation constant. Prior treatment with endocrine or chemotherapy did not diminish the ability of estrogen receptor determinations to predict response to subsequent endocrine therapy. Response rate in estrogen receptor positive tumors was not affected by extent of disease, site of involvement with metastatic tumor, or prior therapy. We conclude that these negative prognostic factors are less important in predicting response to endocrine therapy than estrogen receptor values.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)323-331
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean Journal of Cancer (1965)
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1980
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Estrogen Receptors
Breast Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Neoplasms
Proteins
Retrospective Studies
Drug Therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

Estrogen receptor status : an important variable in predicting response to endocrine therapy in metastatic breast cancer. / Allegra, Joseph C.; Lippman, Marc E; Thompson, E. Brad; Simon, Richard; Barlock, Audrey; Green, Linda; Huff, Karen K.; Do, Hoan M Y T; Aitken, Susan C.; Warren, Robert.

In: European Journal of Cancer (1965), Vol. 16, No. 3, 01.01.1980, p. 323-331.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Allegra, JC, Lippman, ME, Thompson, EB, Simon, R, Barlock, A, Green, L, Huff, KK, Do, HMYT, Aitken, SC & Warren, R 1980, 'Estrogen receptor status: an important variable in predicting response to endocrine therapy in metastatic breast cancer', European Journal of Cancer (1965), vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 323-331. https://doi.org/10.1016/0014-2964(80)90348-5
Allegra, Joseph C. ; Lippman, Marc E ; Thompson, E. Brad ; Simon, Richard ; Barlock, Audrey ; Green, Linda ; Huff, Karen K. ; Do, Hoan M Y T ; Aitken, Susan C. ; Warren, Robert. / Estrogen receptor status : an important variable in predicting response to endocrine therapy in metastatic breast cancer. In: European Journal of Cancer (1965). 1980 ; Vol. 16, No. 3. pp. 323-331.
@article{2b8ec32e58524feaa1ca97cff1066be8,
title = "Estrogen receptor status: an important variable in predicting response to endocrine therapy in metastatic breast cancer",
abstract = "The influence of estrogen receptor status on response rate to endocrine therapy in 85 patients with metastatic breast cancer was determined in a retrospective study. The specific purpose of this study was to assess the role of estrogen receptor determinations in the light of a host of clinical variables known or suspected to influence response rates to endocrine therapy. Thirty-four of 52 patients whose tumors contained significant amounts of estrogen receptor (>10 fmole/mg cytoplasmic protein) had objective responses to endocrine therapy while only 3 33 patients whose tumors did not possess estrogen receptor (< 10 fmole/mg cytoplasmic protein) responded (P < 0.0001). A quantitative relationship was found between the amount of estrogen receptor and response rate. The quantity of estrogen receptor was not associated with the duration of response. The predictive value of the estrogen receptor assay was not associated with the receptor dissociation constant. Prior treatment with endocrine or chemotherapy did not diminish the ability of estrogen receptor determinations to predict response to subsequent endocrine therapy. Response rate in estrogen receptor positive tumors was not affected by extent of disease, site of involvement with metastatic tumor, or prior therapy. We conclude that these negative prognostic factors are less important in predicting response to endocrine therapy than estrogen receptor values.",
author = "Allegra, {Joseph C.} and Lippman, {Marc E} and Thompson, {E. Brad} and Richard Simon and Audrey Barlock and Linda Green and Huff, {Karen K.} and Do, {Hoan M Y T} and Aitken, {Susan C.} and Robert Warren",
year = "1980",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/0014-2964(80)90348-5",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "323--331",
journal = "European journal of cancer",
issn = "0014-2964",
publisher = "Pergamon Press Ltd.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Estrogen receptor status

T2 - an important variable in predicting response to endocrine therapy in metastatic breast cancer

AU - Allegra, Joseph C.

AU - Lippman, Marc E

AU - Thompson, E. Brad

AU - Simon, Richard

AU - Barlock, Audrey

AU - Green, Linda

AU - Huff, Karen K.

AU - Do, Hoan M Y T

AU - Aitken, Susan C.

AU - Warren, Robert

PY - 1980/1/1

Y1 - 1980/1/1

N2 - The influence of estrogen receptor status on response rate to endocrine therapy in 85 patients with metastatic breast cancer was determined in a retrospective study. The specific purpose of this study was to assess the role of estrogen receptor determinations in the light of a host of clinical variables known or suspected to influence response rates to endocrine therapy. Thirty-four of 52 patients whose tumors contained significant amounts of estrogen receptor (>10 fmole/mg cytoplasmic protein) had objective responses to endocrine therapy while only 3 33 patients whose tumors did not possess estrogen receptor (< 10 fmole/mg cytoplasmic protein) responded (P < 0.0001). A quantitative relationship was found between the amount of estrogen receptor and response rate. The quantity of estrogen receptor was not associated with the duration of response. The predictive value of the estrogen receptor assay was not associated with the receptor dissociation constant. Prior treatment with endocrine or chemotherapy did not diminish the ability of estrogen receptor determinations to predict response to subsequent endocrine therapy. Response rate in estrogen receptor positive tumors was not affected by extent of disease, site of involvement with metastatic tumor, or prior therapy. We conclude that these negative prognostic factors are less important in predicting response to endocrine therapy than estrogen receptor values.

AB - The influence of estrogen receptor status on response rate to endocrine therapy in 85 patients with metastatic breast cancer was determined in a retrospective study. The specific purpose of this study was to assess the role of estrogen receptor determinations in the light of a host of clinical variables known or suspected to influence response rates to endocrine therapy. Thirty-four of 52 patients whose tumors contained significant amounts of estrogen receptor (>10 fmole/mg cytoplasmic protein) had objective responses to endocrine therapy while only 3 33 patients whose tumors did not possess estrogen receptor (< 10 fmole/mg cytoplasmic protein) responded (P < 0.0001). A quantitative relationship was found between the amount of estrogen receptor and response rate. The quantity of estrogen receptor was not associated with the duration of response. The predictive value of the estrogen receptor assay was not associated with the receptor dissociation constant. Prior treatment with endocrine or chemotherapy did not diminish the ability of estrogen receptor determinations to predict response to subsequent endocrine therapy. Response rate in estrogen receptor positive tumors was not affected by extent of disease, site of involvement with metastatic tumor, or prior therapy. We conclude that these negative prognostic factors are less important in predicting response to endocrine therapy than estrogen receptor values.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0018901028&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0018901028&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0014-2964(80)90348-5

DO - 10.1016/0014-2964(80)90348-5

M3 - Article

C2 - 7371687

AN - SCOPUS:0018901028

VL - 16

SP - 323

EP - 331

JO - European journal of cancer

JF - European journal of cancer

SN - 0014-2964

IS - 3

ER -