Estimating dispersal and survival of anopheles gambiae and anopheles funestus along the Kenyan coast by using mark-release-recapture methods

Janet T. Midega, Charles M. Mbogo, Henry Mwambi, Michael D. Wilson, Gordon Ojwang, Joseph M. Mwangangi, Joseph G. Nzovu, John I. Githure, Guiyun Yan, John C. Beier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

69 Scopus citations

Abstract

Mark-release-recapture (MRR) experiments were conducted with emerging Anopheles gambiae s.l. and Anopheles funestus Giles at Jaribuni and Mtepeni in Kilifi, along the Kenyan Coast. Of 739 and 1,246 Anopheles released at Jaribuni and Mtepeni, 24.6 and 4.33% were recaptured, respectively. The daily survival probability was 0.96 for An. funestus and 0.95 for An. gambiae in Jaribuni and 0.83 and 0.95, respectively, in Mtepeni. The maximum flight distance recorded was 661 m. The high survival probability of An. gambiae and An. funestus estimated accounts for the continuous transmission of malaria along the Kenyan coast. This study also shows that the release of young, emergent female Anopheles improves the recapture rates and may be a better approach to MRR studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)923-929
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of medical entomology
Volume44
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2007

Keywords

  • Anopheles funestus
  • Anopheles gambiae
  • Dispersal
  • Mark-release-recapture
  • Survival probability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science
  • veterinary(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Estimating dispersal and survival of anopheles gambiae and anopheles funestus along the Kenyan coast by using mark-release-recapture methods'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this