Estimated risk of developing selected DSM-IV disorders among 5-year-old children with prenatal cocaine exposure

Connie E Morrow, Veronica H Accornero, Lihua Xue, Sudha Manjunath, Jan L. Culbertson, James C. Anthony, Emmalee S Bandstra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We estimated childhood risk of developing selected DSM-IV Disorders, including Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD), and Separation Anxiety Disorder (SAD), in children with prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE). Children were enrolled prospectively at birth (n = 476) with prenatal drug exposures documented by maternal interview, urine and meconium assays. Study participants included 400 African-American children from the birth cohort, 208 cocaine-exposed (CE) and 192 non-cocaine-exposed (NCE), who attended a 5-year follow-up assessment and whose caregiver completed the Computerized Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children. Under a generalized linear model (logistic link), Fisher's exact methods were used to estimate the PCE-associated relative risk (RR) of these disorders. Our results indicated a modest but statistically robust elevation of ADHD risk associated with increasing levels of PCE (p < 0.05). Binary comparison of CE versus NCE children indicated no PCE-associated RR. Estimated cumulative incidence proportions among CE children were 2.9% for ADHD (vs 3.1% NCE); 1.4% for SAD (vs 1.6% NCE); and 4.3% for ODD (vs 6.8% NCE). Our findings suggest evidence of increased risk of ADHD (but not ODD or SAD) in relation to an increasing gradient of PCE during gestation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)356-364
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Child and Family Studies
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2009

Fingerprint

Cocaine
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
ADHD
Separation Anxiety
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders
anxiety
Parturition
Interviews
interview
linear model
Maternal Exposure
Meconium
caregiver
diagnostic
incidence
logistics
childhood
African Americans
Caregivers

Keywords

  • ADHD
  • DSM-IV Disorders
  • Prenatal cocaine exposure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

Estimated risk of developing selected DSM-IV disorders among 5-year-old children with prenatal cocaine exposure. / Morrow, Connie E; Accornero, Veronica H; Xue, Lihua; Manjunath, Sudha; Culbertson, Jan L.; Anthony, James C.; Bandstra, Emmalee S.

In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, Vol. 18, No. 3, 01.06.2009, p. 356-364.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Morrow, Connie E ; Accornero, Veronica H ; Xue, Lihua ; Manjunath, Sudha ; Culbertson, Jan L. ; Anthony, James C. ; Bandstra, Emmalee S. / Estimated risk of developing selected DSM-IV disorders among 5-year-old children with prenatal cocaine exposure. In: Journal of Child and Family Studies. 2009 ; Vol. 18, No. 3. pp. 356-364.
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