Epistemological Relativism: Arguments Pro and Con

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Is knowledge (or truth or justifi cation) relative - to time, to place, to society, to culture, to historical epoch, to conceptual scheme or framework, or to personal training or conviction - in that what counts as knowledge (or as true or justifi ed) depends upon the value of one or more of these variables? Or is it, rather, absolute - and if so, exactly what does such absolutism involve or require? This chapter reviews and assesses several important arguments, both historical and contemporary, for and against epistemological relativism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationA Companion to Relativism
PublisherWiley-Blackwell
Pages199-218
Number of pages20
ISBN (Print)9781405190213
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 20 2011

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Keywords

  • A newer argument pro: Hales's defense of relativism
  • Ambivalence concerning relativism - the case of Richard Rorty
  • Ancient and seemingly powerful criticisms - a resurgence of relativism
  • Epistemic relativism - epistemological relativism, arguments pro and con
  • Epistemological relativism, that knowledge relative - to time, to place, to society, to culture
  • Knowledge (or truth or justification) relative - to time, to place, to society, to culture, to historical epoch, to conceptual scheme or framework
  • Non-relativist, all proposed standards (and meta-standards) - open to challenge
  • Opponents of relativism - making criticisms of doctrine
  • Protagorean relativism, the first instance - a doctrine about relativity of truth
  • Relativism is thus incoherent in that - if it is true (or right or justified)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

Cite this

Siegel, H. (2011). Epistemological Relativism: Arguments Pro and Con. In A Companion to Relativism (pp. 199-218). Wiley-Blackwell. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781444392494.ch11