Epidemiology of knee injuries among U.S. high school athletes, 2005/2006-2010/2011

David M. Swenson, Christy L. Collins, Thomas Best, David C. Flanigan, Sarah K. Fields, R. Dawn Comstock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

133 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: U.S. high school athletes sustain millions of injuries annually. Detailed patterns of knee injuries, among the most costly sports injuries, remain largely unknown. We hypothesize that patterns of knee injuries in U.S. high school sports differ by sport and sex. METHODS: U.S. high school sports-related injury data were collected for 20 sports using the National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance System, High School RIO™. Knee injury rates, rate ratios (RR), and injury proportion ratios were calculated. RESULTS: From 2005/2006 to 2010/2011, 5116 knee injuries occurred during 17,172,376 athlete exposures (AE) for an overall rate of 2.98 knee injuries per 10,000 AE. Knee injuries were more common in competition than in practice (rate ratio = 3.53, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.34-3.73). Football had the highest knee injury rate (6.29 per 10,000 AE) followed by girls' soccer (4.53) and girls' gymnastics (4.23). Girls had significantly higher knee injury rates than boys in sex-comparable sports (soccer, volleyball, basketball, baseball/softball, lacrosse, swimming and diving, and track and field; RR = 1.52, 95% CI = 1.39-1.65). The most commonly involved structure was the medial collateral ligament (reported in 36.1% of knee injuries), followed by the patella/patellar tendon (29.5%), anterior cruciate ligament (25.4%), meniscus (23.0%), lateral collateral ligament (7.9%), and posterior cruciate ligament (2.4%). Girls were significantly more likely to sustain anterior cruciate ligament injuries in sex-comparable sports (RR = 2.38, 95% CI = 1.91-2.95). Overall, 21.2% of knee injuries were treated with surgery; girls were more often treated with surgery than boys in sex-comparable sports (injury proportion ratio = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.11-1.53). CONCLUSIONS: Knee injury patterns differ by sport and sex. Continuing efforts to develop preventive interventions could reduce the burden of these injuries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)462-469
Number of pages8
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume45
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Knee Injuries
Athletes
Epidemiology
Sports
Athletic Injuries
Confidence Intervals
Baseball
Patellar Ligament
Soccer
Wounds and Injuries
Track and Field
Racquet Sports
Volleyball
Ankle Lateral Ligament
Posterior Cruciate Ligament
Gymnastics
Basketball
Collateral Ligaments
Diving
Football

Keywords

  • ACL
  • meniscus
  • Sports
  • surveillance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Epidemiology of knee injuries among U.S. high school athletes, 2005/2006-2010/2011. / Swenson, David M.; Collins, Christy L.; Best, Thomas; Flanigan, David C.; Fields, Sarah K.; Comstock, R. Dawn.

In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 45, No. 3, 01.03.2013, p. 462-469.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Swenson, David M. ; Collins, Christy L. ; Best, Thomas ; Flanigan, David C. ; Fields, Sarah K. ; Comstock, R. Dawn. / Epidemiology of knee injuries among U.S. high school athletes, 2005/2006-2010/2011. In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2013 ; Vol. 45, No. 3. pp. 462-469.
@article{7c63ff9a1cac41378d5dc42457f5af16,
title = "Epidemiology of knee injuries among U.S. high school athletes, 2005/2006-2010/2011",
abstract = "PURPOSE: U.S. high school athletes sustain millions of injuries annually. Detailed patterns of knee injuries, among the most costly sports injuries, remain largely unknown. We hypothesize that patterns of knee injuries in U.S. high school sports differ by sport and sex. METHODS: U.S. high school sports-related injury data were collected for 20 sports using the National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance System, High School RIO™. Knee injury rates, rate ratios (RR), and injury proportion ratios were calculated. RESULTS: From 2005/2006 to 2010/2011, 5116 knee injuries occurred during 17,172,376 athlete exposures (AE) for an overall rate of 2.98 knee injuries per 10,000 AE. Knee injuries were more common in competition than in practice (rate ratio = 3.53, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] = 3.34-3.73). Football had the highest knee injury rate (6.29 per 10,000 AE) followed by girls' soccer (4.53) and girls' gymnastics (4.23). Girls had significantly higher knee injury rates than boys in sex-comparable sports (soccer, volleyball, basketball, baseball/softball, lacrosse, swimming and diving, and track and field; RR = 1.52, 95{\%} CI = 1.39-1.65). The most commonly involved structure was the medial collateral ligament (reported in 36.1{\%} of knee injuries), followed by the patella/patellar tendon (29.5{\%}), anterior cruciate ligament (25.4{\%}), meniscus (23.0{\%}), lateral collateral ligament (7.9{\%}), and posterior cruciate ligament (2.4{\%}). Girls were significantly more likely to sustain anterior cruciate ligament injuries in sex-comparable sports (RR = 2.38, 95{\%} CI = 1.91-2.95). Overall, 21.2{\%} of knee injuries were treated with surgery; girls were more often treated with surgery than boys in sex-comparable sports (injury proportion ratio = 1.30, 95{\%} CI = 1.11-1.53). CONCLUSIONS: Knee injury patterns differ by sport and sex. Continuing efforts to develop preventive interventions could reduce the burden of these injuries.",
keywords = "ACL, meniscus, Sports, surveillance",
author = "Swenson, {David M.} and Collins, {Christy L.} and Thomas Best and Flanigan, {David C.} and Fields, {Sarah K.} and Comstock, {R. Dawn}",
year = "2013",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1249/MSS.0b013e318277acca",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "45",
pages = "462--469",
journal = "Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise",
issn = "0195-9131",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Epidemiology of knee injuries among U.S. high school athletes, 2005/2006-2010/2011

AU - Swenson, David M.

AU - Collins, Christy L.

AU - Best, Thomas

AU - Flanigan, David C.

AU - Fields, Sarah K.

AU - Comstock, R. Dawn

PY - 2013/3/1

Y1 - 2013/3/1

N2 - PURPOSE: U.S. high school athletes sustain millions of injuries annually. Detailed patterns of knee injuries, among the most costly sports injuries, remain largely unknown. We hypothesize that patterns of knee injuries in U.S. high school sports differ by sport and sex. METHODS: U.S. high school sports-related injury data were collected for 20 sports using the National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance System, High School RIO™. Knee injury rates, rate ratios (RR), and injury proportion ratios were calculated. RESULTS: From 2005/2006 to 2010/2011, 5116 knee injuries occurred during 17,172,376 athlete exposures (AE) for an overall rate of 2.98 knee injuries per 10,000 AE. Knee injuries were more common in competition than in practice (rate ratio = 3.53, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.34-3.73). Football had the highest knee injury rate (6.29 per 10,000 AE) followed by girls' soccer (4.53) and girls' gymnastics (4.23). Girls had significantly higher knee injury rates than boys in sex-comparable sports (soccer, volleyball, basketball, baseball/softball, lacrosse, swimming and diving, and track and field; RR = 1.52, 95% CI = 1.39-1.65). The most commonly involved structure was the medial collateral ligament (reported in 36.1% of knee injuries), followed by the patella/patellar tendon (29.5%), anterior cruciate ligament (25.4%), meniscus (23.0%), lateral collateral ligament (7.9%), and posterior cruciate ligament (2.4%). Girls were significantly more likely to sustain anterior cruciate ligament injuries in sex-comparable sports (RR = 2.38, 95% CI = 1.91-2.95). Overall, 21.2% of knee injuries were treated with surgery; girls were more often treated with surgery than boys in sex-comparable sports (injury proportion ratio = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.11-1.53). CONCLUSIONS: Knee injury patterns differ by sport and sex. Continuing efforts to develop preventive interventions could reduce the burden of these injuries.

AB - PURPOSE: U.S. high school athletes sustain millions of injuries annually. Detailed patterns of knee injuries, among the most costly sports injuries, remain largely unknown. We hypothesize that patterns of knee injuries in U.S. high school sports differ by sport and sex. METHODS: U.S. high school sports-related injury data were collected for 20 sports using the National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance System, High School RIO™. Knee injury rates, rate ratios (RR), and injury proportion ratios were calculated. RESULTS: From 2005/2006 to 2010/2011, 5116 knee injuries occurred during 17,172,376 athlete exposures (AE) for an overall rate of 2.98 knee injuries per 10,000 AE. Knee injuries were more common in competition than in practice (rate ratio = 3.53, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.34-3.73). Football had the highest knee injury rate (6.29 per 10,000 AE) followed by girls' soccer (4.53) and girls' gymnastics (4.23). Girls had significantly higher knee injury rates than boys in sex-comparable sports (soccer, volleyball, basketball, baseball/softball, lacrosse, swimming and diving, and track and field; RR = 1.52, 95% CI = 1.39-1.65). The most commonly involved structure was the medial collateral ligament (reported in 36.1% of knee injuries), followed by the patella/patellar tendon (29.5%), anterior cruciate ligament (25.4%), meniscus (23.0%), lateral collateral ligament (7.9%), and posterior cruciate ligament (2.4%). Girls were significantly more likely to sustain anterior cruciate ligament injuries in sex-comparable sports (RR = 2.38, 95% CI = 1.91-2.95). Overall, 21.2% of knee injuries were treated with surgery; girls were more often treated with surgery than boys in sex-comparable sports (injury proportion ratio = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.11-1.53). CONCLUSIONS: Knee injury patterns differ by sport and sex. Continuing efforts to develop preventive interventions could reduce the burden of these injuries.

KW - ACL

KW - meniscus

KW - Sports

KW - surveillance

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84875209650&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84875209650&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1249/MSS.0b013e318277acca

DO - 10.1249/MSS.0b013e318277acca

M3 - Article

C2 - 23059869

AN - SCOPUS:84875209650

VL - 45

SP - 462

EP - 469

JO - Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

JF - Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

SN - 0195-9131

IS - 3

ER -