Epidemiology of hepatitis B vaccine acceptance among urban paramedics and emergency medical technicians

David J Lee, Lillian Carrillo, Lora Fleming

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The epidemiologic pattern of hepatitis B vaccination acceptance has not been thoroughly examined in medical first responders. Methods: A blood-borne pathogen questionnaire was administered to 255 paramedics and emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in a large, urban fire department. Results: The overall prevalence of hepatitis B vaccination was 78%. The most frequently cited reason for not getting vaccinated was fear of contracting the hepatitis B virus from the vaccination (26%). Vaccination scheduling difficulties (23%) and lack of time to get vaccinated (20%) were also cited. Increased age, being an EMT, and not having obtained the rank of officer were independently and significantly associated with not having been vaccinated. Conclusions: Educational campaigns for medical first responders are needed to increase vaccination compliance, with a special emphasis on older workers and EMTs. Administrative barriers, such as vaccination scheduling difficulties, should also be addressed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)421-423
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Infection Control
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 1997

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Emergency Medical Technicians
Allied Health Personnel
Hepatitis B Vaccines
Vaccination
Epidemiology
Hepatitis B
Blood-Borne Pathogens
Hepatitis B virus
Fear

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Epidemiology of hepatitis B vaccine acceptance among urban paramedics and emergency medical technicians. / Lee, David J; Carrillo, Lillian; Fleming, Lora.

In: American Journal of Infection Control, Vol. 25, No. 5, 01.10.1997, p. 421-423.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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