Epidemiologic background and long‐term course of disease in human immunodeficiency virus type 1‐infected blood donors identified before routine laboratory screening. Transfusion Safety Study Group

J. W. MOSLEY, E. A. OPERSKALSKI, C. E. STEVENS, E. R. SCHIFF, S. H. KLEINMAN, H. LEE, M. LEE, M. HARRIS

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The long-term course of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-related disease among seropositive blood donors has not been described. The enrollment and epidemiologic background of HIV-1-infected donors in the Transfusion Safety Study and their immunologic and clinical progression are described. Study Design and Methods: Through the testing of approximately 200,000 sera from donations made in late 1984 and early 1985, 146 anti-HIV-1-positive donors and 151 uninfected matched donors were enrolled. These two cohorts were followed with 6-month interval histories and laboratory testing. Results: Seropositive donors detected before the institution of routine anti-HIV-1 screening disproportionately were first- time donors and men with exclusively male sexual contacts. The actuarial probability of a person's developing AIDS within 7 years after donation was 40 percent; the probability of a person's dying of AIDS was 28 percent. AIDS developed more often when the donor was p24 antigen-positive at donation. Over a 3-year period, significant decreases occurred in CD4+, CD2+CD26+, CD4+CD29+, and CD20+CD21+ counts, but not in CD8+ subsets, CD20+, or CD14+. Conclusion: The high proportions of first-time donations and exclusively homosexual men among seropositive donors suggest that test- seeking may have contributed to the high HIV-1 prevalence in the repository. Implementation of alternative test sites when routine donor screening began in 1985 may have averted many high-risk donations. The disease course in HIV- 1-infected donors had the same wide spectrum of immunologic and clinical manifestations as were reported for other cohorts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)858-864
Number of pages7
JournalTransfusion
Volume34
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Hematology

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