Environmental controls, oceanography and population dynamics of pathogens and harmful algal blooms: Connecting sources to human exposure

Julianne Dyble, Paul Bienfang, Eva Dusek, Gary Hitchcock, Fred Holland, Ed Laws, James Lerczak, Dennis J. McGillicuddy, Peter J Minnett, Stephanie K. Moore, Charles O'Kelly, Helena M Solo-Gabriele, John D. Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Coupled physical-biological models are capable of linking the complex interactions between environmental factors and physical hydrodynamics to simulate the growth, toxicity and transport of infectious pathogens and harmful algal blooms (HABs). Such simulations can be used to assess and predict the impact of pathogens and HABs on human health. Given the widespread and increasing reliance of coastal communities on aquatic systems for drinking water, seafood and recreation, such predictions are critical for making informed resource management decisions. Here we identify three challenges to making this connection between pathogens/HABs and human health: predicting concentrations and toxicity; identifying the spatial and temporal scales of population and ecosystem interactions; and applying the understanding of population dynamics of pathogens/HABs to management strategies. We elaborate on the need to meet each of these challenges, describe how modeling approaches can be used and discuss strategies for moving forward in addressing these challenges.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberS5
JournalEnvironmental Health: A Global Access Science Source
Volume7
Issue numberSUPPL. 2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 17 2008

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Oceanography
Harmful Algal Bloom
Population Dynamics
Recreation
Seafood
Biological Models
Health
Hydrodynamics
Drinking Water
Ecosystem
Growth
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Environmental controls, oceanography and population dynamics of pathogens and harmful algal blooms : Connecting sources to human exposure. / Dyble, Julianne; Bienfang, Paul; Dusek, Eva; Hitchcock, Gary; Holland, Fred; Laws, Ed; Lerczak, James; McGillicuddy, Dennis J.; Minnett, Peter J; Moore, Stephanie K.; O'Kelly, Charles; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Wang, John D.

In: Environmental Health: A Global Access Science Source, Vol. 7, No. SUPPL. 2, S5, 17.11.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dyble, Julianne ; Bienfang, Paul ; Dusek, Eva ; Hitchcock, Gary ; Holland, Fred ; Laws, Ed ; Lerczak, James ; McGillicuddy, Dennis J. ; Minnett, Peter J ; Moore, Stephanie K. ; O'Kelly, Charles ; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M ; Wang, John D. / Environmental controls, oceanography and population dynamics of pathogens and harmful algal blooms : Connecting sources to human exposure. In: Environmental Health: A Global Access Science Source. 2008 ; Vol. 7, No. SUPPL. 2.
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