Environmental and Occupational Exposures and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in New England

Angeline S. Andrew, Tracie A. Caller, Rup Tandan, Eric J. Duell, Patricia L. Henegan, Nicholas C. Field, Walter G Bradley, Elijah W. Stommel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Recent data provide support for the concept that potentially modifiable exposures are responsible for sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Objective: To evaluate environmental and occupational exposures as risk factors for sporadic ALS. Methods: We performed a case-control study of ALS among residents of New England, USA. The analysis compared questionnaire responses from 295 patients with a confirmed ALS diagnosis to those of 225 controls without neurodegenerative illness. Results: Self-reported job-or hobby-related exposure to one or more chemicals, such as pesticides, solvents, or heavy metals, increased the risk of ALS (adjusted OR 2.51; 95% CI 1.64-3.89). Industries with a higher toxicant exposure potential (construction, manufacturing, mechanical, military, or painting) were associated with an elevated occupational risk (adjusted OR 3.95; 95% CI 2.04-8.30). We also identified increases in the risk of ALS associated with frequent participation in water sports, particularly waterskiing (adjusted OR 3.89; 95% CI 1.97-8.44). Occupation and waterskiing both retained independent statistical significance in a composite model containing age, gender, and smoking status. Conclusions: Our study contributes to a growing body of literature implicating occupational-and hobby-related toxicant exposures in ALS etiology. These epidemiologic study results also provide motivation for future evaluation of water-body-related risk factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)110-116
Number of pages7
JournalNeurodegenerative Diseases
Volume17
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

New England
Environmental Exposure
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Occupational Exposure
Hobbies
Paintings
Body Water
Heavy Metals
Occupations
Pesticides
Sports
Case-Control Studies
Motivation
Epidemiologic Studies
Industry
Smoking
Water

Keywords

  • Environmental exposure
  • Occupation
  • Toxicant
  • Water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Andrew, A. S., Caller, T. A., Tandan, R., Duell, E. J., Henegan, P. L., Field, N. C., ... Stommel, E. W. (2017). Environmental and Occupational Exposures and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in New England. Neurodegenerative Diseases, 17(2-3), 110-116. https://doi.org/10.1159/000453359

Environmental and Occupational Exposures and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in New England. / Andrew, Angeline S.; Caller, Tracie A.; Tandan, Rup; Duell, Eric J.; Henegan, Patricia L.; Field, Nicholas C.; Bradley, Walter G; Stommel, Elijah W.

In: Neurodegenerative Diseases, Vol. 17, No. 2-3, 01.02.2017, p. 110-116.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Andrew, AS, Caller, TA, Tandan, R, Duell, EJ, Henegan, PL, Field, NC, Bradley, WG & Stommel, EW 2017, 'Environmental and Occupational Exposures and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in New England', Neurodegenerative Diseases, vol. 17, no. 2-3, pp. 110-116. https://doi.org/10.1159/000453359
Andrew AS, Caller TA, Tandan R, Duell EJ, Henegan PL, Field NC et al. Environmental and Occupational Exposures and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in New England. Neurodegenerative Diseases. 2017 Feb 1;17(2-3):110-116. https://doi.org/10.1159/000453359
Andrew, Angeline S. ; Caller, Tracie A. ; Tandan, Rup ; Duell, Eric J. ; Henegan, Patricia L. ; Field, Nicholas C. ; Bradley, Walter G ; Stommel, Elijah W. / Environmental and Occupational Exposures and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in New England. In: Neurodegenerative Diseases. 2017 ; Vol. 17, No. 2-3. pp. 110-116.
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