Enhancement and Demyefination of the Intraorbital Optic Nerve: Fat Suppression Magnetic Resonance Imaging

John Guy, Jintong Mao, W. Dean Bidgood, Anthony Mancuso, Ronald G. Quisling

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Abstract

Conventional spin-echo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of intraorbital optic neuritis is hampered by the adjacent high signal and chemical shift artifact of orbital fat. Frequency-selective saturation pulse MRI reduces these problems and was used to determine its utility in evaluation of intraorbital optic neuritis. Eight consecutive patients with optic neuritis underwent MRI within 1 week of the onset of visual loss. Conventional MRI with T1, proton density, and T2 weighting and frequency-selective saturation pulse MRI with T1, proton density, and T2 weighting were performed. After administration of intravenous gadopentetate dimeglumine, T1-weighted conventional and frequency-selective saturation pulse MRI were performed. Frequency-selective saturation pulse MRI showed gadopentetate dimeglumine enhancement in the intraorbital optic nerve in 7 patients and the intracranial optic nerve in 3 patients. Conventional MRI failed to show optic nerve gadopentetate dimeglumine enhancement in patients with intraorbital lesions, but did show intracranial lesions. Frequency-selective saturation pulse MRI showed bilateral optic nerve enhancement in 3 patients with unilateral visual signs and symptoms. Proton density and T2-weighted conventional MRI of the brain showed no convincing signal aberrations in the optic nerves. In the MRI evaluation of intraorbital optic neuritis: (1) frequency-selective saturation pulse fat suppression MRI is superior to T1- weighted conventional MRI in the detection of gadopentetate dimeglumine enhancement; (2) frequency-selective saturation pulse proton density and T2- weighted MRI is superior to proton density and T2-weighted conventional MRI; (3) frequency-selective saturation pulse MRI showed gadopentetate dimeglumine enhancement as well as proton density/T2-weighted signal aberration in exactly the same portion of the intraorbital optic nerve.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)713-719
Number of pages7
JournalOphthalmology
Volume99
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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