Engineering complement activation on polypropylene sulfide vaccine nanoparticles

Susan N. Thomas, André J. van der Vlies, Conlin P. O'Neil, Sai T. Reddy, Shann S. Yu, Todd D. Giorgio, Melody A. Swartz, Jeffrey A. Hubbell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The complement system is an important regulator of both adaptive and innate immunity, implicating complement as a potential target for immunotherapeutics. We have recently presented lymph node-targeting, complement-activating nanoparticles (NPs) as a vaccine platform. Here we explore modulation of surface chemistry as a means to control complement deposition, in active or inactive forms, on polypropylene sulfide core, block copolymer Pluronic corona NPs. We found that nucleophile-containing NP surfaces activated complement and became functionalized in situ with C3 upon serum exposure via the alternative pathway. Carboxylated NPs displayed a higher degree of C3b deposition and retention relative to hydroxylated NPs, upon which deposited C3b was more substantially inactivated to iC3b. This in situ functionalization correlated with in vivo antigen-specific immune responses, including antibody production as well as T cell proliferation and IFN-γ cytokine production upon antigen restimulation. Interestingly, inactivation of C3b to iC3b on the NP surface did not correlate with NP affinity to factor H, a cofactor for protease factor I that degrades C3b into iC3b, indicating that control of complement protein C3 stability depends on architectural details in addition to factor H affinity. These data show that design of NP surface chemistry can be used to control biomaterials-associated complement activation for immunotherapeutic materials.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2194-2203
Number of pages10
JournalBiomaterials
Volume32
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Vaccines
Polypropylenes
Complement Activation
Sulfides
Nanoparticles
Chemical activation
Complement C3b
Complement Factor H
Antigens
Surface chemistry
Poloxamer
Nucleophiles
Complement C3
T-cells
Protein Stability
Histocompatibility Antigens Class II
Cell proliferation
Biocompatible Materials
Adaptive Immunity
Innate Immunity

Keywords

  • Complement
  • Immunomodulation
  • Nanoparticle
  • Protein adsorption

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomaterials
  • Bioengineering
  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Biophysics

Cite this

Thomas, S. N., van der Vlies, A. J., O'Neil, C. P., Reddy, S. T., Yu, S. S., Giorgio, T. D., ... Hubbell, J. A. (2011). Engineering complement activation on polypropylene sulfide vaccine nanoparticles. Biomaterials, 32(8), 2194-2203. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biomaterials.2010.11.037

Engineering complement activation on polypropylene sulfide vaccine nanoparticles. / Thomas, Susan N.; van der Vlies, André J.; O'Neil, Conlin P.; Reddy, Sai T.; Yu, Shann S.; Giorgio, Todd D.; Swartz, Melody A.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

In: Biomaterials, Vol. 32, No. 8, 01.03.2011, p. 2194-2203.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thomas, SN, van der Vlies, AJ, O'Neil, CP, Reddy, ST, Yu, SS, Giorgio, TD, Swartz, MA & Hubbell, JA 2011, 'Engineering complement activation on polypropylene sulfide vaccine nanoparticles', Biomaterials, vol. 32, no. 8, pp. 2194-2203. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biomaterials.2010.11.037
Thomas SN, van der Vlies AJ, O'Neil CP, Reddy ST, Yu SS, Giorgio TD et al. Engineering complement activation on polypropylene sulfide vaccine nanoparticles. Biomaterials. 2011 Mar 1;32(8):2194-2203. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biomaterials.2010.11.037
Thomas, Susan N. ; van der Vlies, André J. ; O'Neil, Conlin P. ; Reddy, Sai T. ; Yu, Shann S. ; Giorgio, Todd D. ; Swartz, Melody A. ; Hubbell, Jeffrey A. / Engineering complement activation on polypropylene sulfide vaccine nanoparticles. In: Biomaterials. 2011 ; Vol. 32, No. 8. pp. 2194-2203.
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