Engaging the capacity of comadronas as HIV prevention providers in rural Guatemala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this study the author address rural Guatemala’s poor maternal health and HIV status by integrating an effective evidence-based HIV intervention (SEPA), with local implementing health partners to extend the capacity of comadronas (traditional Mayan birth attendants) to encompass HIV prevention. I employed a multi-method design consisting of a focus group, an interview, and participant observation to identify important factors surrounding comadrona receptivity towards expanding their capacity to HIV prevention. I analyzed data using thematic analysis and identified four categories: Project logistics, HIV knowledge and risk assessment, condom perceptions, and HIV testing perceptions. I affirm comadrona receptivity toward HIV prevention, and that will guide future cultural adaptation and tailoring of SEPA for comadrona training. I will use my results to create a prototype intervention that could be applied to other similarly underserved indigenous communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHealth Care for Women International
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Guatemala
HIV
Condoms
Midwifery
Focus Groups
Health Status
Observation
Interviews
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

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