Energy Savings Potential in a Medical Facility through Custom Minimum Airflow Resets

Shima Shahahmadi, Alejandro Rivas, Li Song, Gang Wang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Significant energy use in heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in buildings motivates the potential for improvements in the performance of such systems and their controls. The objective of this study is to customize the minimum airflow ratio setting in a medical facility so that the fan speed and energy level are reduced to conserve energy and, at the same time, the ventilation requirements for the critical zones and the temperature remain at desired levels. A series of tests were conducted in a military medical building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The air-handling units that are used in this study distribute conditioned air to offices and pharmacy spaces. Considering the medical environment, maintaining a proper airflow rate and keeping the temperature at a pre-determined level are critical. This customization is guided by the recent revisions to ASHRAE Standard 90.1. While maintaining 30% minimum air flow during occupied hours for noncritical zones and keeping critical zones intact, our results show that the fan speed declined from 30% to 75% and the energy level declined from 15% to 90% in different units during the experimental period from March 2016 to August 2016. Although the energy savings may vary, lowering the airflow, as guided by the revised ASHRAE Standard 90.1, may lead to a significant decline in the fan speed and in energy consumption.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAEI 2017
Subtitle of host publicationResilience of the Integrated Building - Proceedings of the Architectural Engineering National Conference 2017
PublisherAmerican Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)
Pages419-431
Number of pages13
ISBN (Electronic)9780784480502
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017
EventArchitectural Engineering National Conference 2017: Resilience of the Integrated Building, AEI 2017 - Oklahoma City, United States
Duration: Apr 11 2017Apr 13 2017

Other

OtherArchitectural Engineering National Conference 2017: Resilience of the Integrated Building, AEI 2017
CountryUnited States
CityOklahoma City
Period4/11/174/13/17

Fingerprint

Fans
Energy conservation
Electron energy levels
Air
Air conditioning
Ventilation
Energy utilization
Heating
Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction
  • Architecture

Cite this

Shahahmadi, S., Rivas, A., Song, L., & Wang, G. (2017). Energy Savings Potential in a Medical Facility through Custom Minimum Airflow Resets. In AEI 2017: Resilience of the Integrated Building - Proceedings of the Architectural Engineering National Conference 2017 (pp. 419-431). American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE).

Energy Savings Potential in a Medical Facility through Custom Minimum Airflow Resets. / Shahahmadi, Shima; Rivas, Alejandro; Song, Li; Wang, Gang.

AEI 2017: Resilience of the Integrated Building - Proceedings of the Architectural Engineering National Conference 2017. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2017. p. 419-431.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Shahahmadi, S, Rivas, A, Song, L & Wang, G 2017, Energy Savings Potential in a Medical Facility through Custom Minimum Airflow Resets. in AEI 2017: Resilience of the Integrated Building - Proceedings of the Architectural Engineering National Conference 2017. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), pp. 419-431, Architectural Engineering National Conference 2017: Resilience of the Integrated Building, AEI 2017, Oklahoma City, United States, 4/11/17.
Shahahmadi S, Rivas A, Song L, Wang G. Energy Savings Potential in a Medical Facility through Custom Minimum Airflow Resets. In AEI 2017: Resilience of the Integrated Building - Proceedings of the Architectural Engineering National Conference 2017. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). 2017. p. 419-431
Shahahmadi, Shima ; Rivas, Alejandro ; Song, Li ; Wang, Gang. / Energy Savings Potential in a Medical Facility through Custom Minimum Airflow Resets. AEI 2017: Resilience of the Integrated Building - Proceedings of the Architectural Engineering National Conference 2017. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2017. pp. 419-431
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