Endoscopic reconstruction of large anterior skull base defects using acellular dermal allograft

Ross M. Germani, Richard Vivero, Islam R. Herzallah, Roy R Casiano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Endoscopic repair of small- to medium-sized anterior skull base (ASB) defects using bone, cartilage, fascia, fibrin glue, lipolized dura, and, more recently, acellular dermal allograft have all been described with equal efficacy. The purpose of this study was to review our experience with the use of acellular dermis as the sole graft material in endoscopic reconstruction of large ASB defects. Methods: A retrospective chart review of all patients who underwent endoscopic repair of ASB defects at the University of Miami between the years of 2001 and 2006 was conducted. Fifty-six patients were identified who met these criteria. All repairs were performed by a transnasal, endoscopic approach. Outcome measures included success of graft take and incidence of major and minor complications. Dural defect size was defined as small (<0.4 cm), intermediate (0.4-2.0 cm), and large (>2.0 cm). Results: AlloDerm (AlloDerm. LifeCell Corp. Woodlands, TX) was used as the primary graft material in 30/55 (55%) cases; 16/55 (29%) of the repaired defects were classified as large. Graft success was 97% in the AlloDerm group and 92% in the non-AlloDerm group. The incidence of major and minor complications in the AlloDerm group was 0 and 3.3%, respectively. In the non-AlloDerm group, the incidence of major and minor complications was 4 and 12%, respectively. There were no statistical differences in the complication rates based on the type of repair or defect size. Conclusion: Alloderm can be used successfully to repair ASB defects, including large defects that are >2 cm in size with little or no morbidity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)615-618
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Rhinology
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2007

Fingerprint

Skull Base
Allografts
Skin
Transplants
Incidence
Acellular Dermis
Fibrin Tissue Adhesive
Fascia
Cartilage
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Alloderm
Morbidity
Bone and Bones

Keywords

  • AlloDerm
  • Anterior skullbase
  • ASB
  • CFS leak
  • Defects
  • Endoscopic
  • Graft
  • Large
  • Reconstruction
  • Success

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Endoscopic reconstruction of large anterior skull base defects using acellular dermal allograft. / Germani, Ross M.; Vivero, Richard; Herzallah, Islam R.; Casiano, Roy R.

In: American Journal of Rhinology, Vol. 21, No. 5, 01.09.2007, p. 615-618.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Germani, Ross M. ; Vivero, Richard ; Herzallah, Islam R. ; Casiano, Roy R. / Endoscopic reconstruction of large anterior skull base defects using acellular dermal allograft. In: American Journal of Rhinology. 2007 ; Vol. 21, No. 5. pp. 615-618.
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