Endophthalmitis: State of the art

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Endophthalmitis is an uncommon diagnosis but can have devastating visual outcomes. Endophthalmitis may be endogenous or exogenous. Exogenous endophthalmitis is caused by introduction of pathogens through mechanisms such as ocular surgery, open-globe trauma, and intravitreal injections. Endogenous endophthalmitis occurs as a result of hematogenous spread of bacteria or fungi into the eye. These categories of endophthalmitis have different risk factors and causative pathogens, and thus require different diagnostic, prevention, and treatment strategies. Novel diagnostic techniques such as real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) have been reported to provide improved diagnostic results over traditional culture techniques and may have a more expanded role in the future. While the role of povidone-iodine in prophylaxis of postoperative endophthalmitis is established, there remains controversy with regard to the effectiveness of other measures, including prophylactic antibiotics. The Endophthalmitis Vitrectomy Study (EVS) has provided us with valuable treatment guidelines. However, these guidelines cannot be directly applied to all categories of endophthalmitis, highlighting the need for continued research into attaining improved treatment outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95-108
Number of pages14
JournalClinical Ophthalmology
Volume9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 8 2015

Fingerprint

Endophthalmitis
Guidelines
Povidone-Iodine
Culture Techniques
Intravitreal Injections
Vitrectomy
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Fungi
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Bacteria
Wounds and Injuries
Therapeutics
Research

Keywords

  • Endogenous
  • Endophthalmitis
  • Exogenous
  • Intravitreal injection
  • Postoperative

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Endophthalmitis : State of the art. / Vaziri, Kamyar; Schwartz, Stephen; Kishor, Krishna; Flynn, Harry W.

In: Clinical Ophthalmology, Vol. 9, 08.01.2015, p. 95-108.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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