Endoluminal stent coatings consisting of adsorbing copolymers reduce neointimal hyperplasia in the pig

Donald Elbert, Jeffrey Hubbell, Gregory Kenausis, Janos Voros, Marcus Textor, Nicholas Spencer, Stephan Windecker, Felix Buddeberg, Thomas Schaffner, Beat Walpoth, Daniel Mettler, Bernhard Meier, Otto Hess

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

The adsorption of blood proteins onto copolymer-treated metal surfaces was measured using an optical waveguide technique. Fibrinogen and other proteins were unable to adsorb to the treated metal surface. Stainless steel stents were coated with the copolymer by adding the stent to buffered water containing 0.1% copolymer for 1 minute, followed by a washing step. The stents were then deployed within healthy coronary arteries in the pig. Lumninal area was measured before and after stent deployment and after six weeks by angiography. After six weeks, the stents were explanted and histology was performed. The stent coating reduced the intima/lumen ratio by about 55% versus an untreated stent (n=6 animals, 3 sections per stent, p<0.025). These results indicate that substantial benefits are obtained by modifying metal biomaterial surfaces with adsorbing copolymers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S-16
JournalAnnals of biomedical engineering
Volume28
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
StatePublished - Dec 1 2000
Event2000 Annual Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society - Washington, WA, USA
Duration: Oct 12 2000Oct 14 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering

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    Elbert, D., Hubbell, J., Kenausis, G., Voros, J., Textor, M., Spencer, N., Windecker, S., Buddeberg, F., Schaffner, T., Walpoth, B., Mettler, D., Meier, B., & Hess, O. (2000). Endoluminal stent coatings consisting of adsorbing copolymers reduce neointimal hyperplasia in the pig. Annals of biomedical engineering, 28(SUPPL. 1), S-16.