Endogenous Klebsiella endophthalmitis: Report of two cases and review of the literature

C. E. Margo, R. N. Mames, John Guy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Endogenous endophthalmitis is a rare complication of gram- negative sepsis. The diagnosis often is delayed unless a high index of suspicion exists. Familiarity with the clinical setting in which endogenous Klebsiella endophthalmitis occurs will hasten diagnosis and may improve outcome. Methods: The authors reviewed the medical literature and describe two patients with diabetes who lost vision from endogenous Klebsiella endophthalmitis. Findings: One patient lost all vision in both eyes before the diagnosis of sepsis was clinically suspected. In the other, endophthalmitis was the only clinical sign of septicemia 8 days after hospital discharge for treatment of a Klebsiella urinary tract infection. Survey of the literature showed an increase in the number of cases of endogenous Klebsiella endophthalmitis reported over the last 12 years. Sixty- one percent of the 44 patients reported in the literature since 1981 had diabetes, 68% had suppurative liver disease, and 16% had urinary tract infection. Conclusion: An important implication of these associations is that metastatic Klebsiella endophthalmitis must be considered when vitritis occurs in patients with diabetes, particularly in those with acute liver disease or a urinary tract infection, or in any patient with vitritis and suppurative liver disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1298-1301
Number of pages4
JournalOphthalmology
Volume101
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Endophthalmitis
Klebsiella
Urinary Tract Infections
Liver Diseases
Sepsis
Acute Disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Endogenous Klebsiella endophthalmitis : Report of two cases and review of the literature. / Margo, C. E.; Mames, R. N.; Guy, John.

In: Ophthalmology, Vol. 101, No. 7, 01.01.1994, p. 1298-1301.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Margo, C. E. ; Mames, R. N. ; Guy, John. / Endogenous Klebsiella endophthalmitis : Report of two cases and review of the literature. In: Ophthalmology. 1994 ; Vol. 101, No. 7. pp. 1298-1301.
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