End-stage renal disease: Why aren't improvements in hypertension treatment reducing the risk?

Edgar Jaimes, Josep Maria Galceran, Leopoldo Raij

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although we have seen a decreased incidence of some of the complications of hypertension, such as myocardial infarction and stroke, the same cannot be said for end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The disparity brings up the question of why improvements in hypertension control apparently do not bring improvement in the incidence of ESRD. Some of the factors likely at play include variation in the mechanisms at work in hypertensive patients of different races and variation in the degree to which antihypertensive agents affect systemic blood pressure and glomerular capillary pressure. These and other factors relating to hypertension and ESRD are the focus of this review.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)471-476
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Cardiology
Volume11
Issue number5
StatePublished - Oct 7 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Chronic Kidney Failure
Hypertension
Incidence
Antihypertensive Agents
Therapeutics
Stroke
Myocardial Infarction
Blood Pressure
Pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

End-stage renal disease : Why aren't improvements in hypertension treatment reducing the risk? / Jaimes, Edgar; Galceran, Josep Maria; Raij, Leopoldo.

In: Current Opinion in Cardiology, Vol. 11, No. 5, 07.10.1996, p. 471-476.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jaimes, Edgar ; Galceran, Josep Maria ; Raij, Leopoldo. / End-stage renal disease : Why aren't improvements in hypertension treatment reducing the risk?. In: Current Opinion in Cardiology. 1996 ; Vol. 11, No. 5. pp. 471-476.
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