EMPIRICAL VALUES AND THE CULTURE OF FAMILY THERAPY

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The research‐clinical practice connection is weak in family therapy. Some have argued, in an inordinate ideological and political tone, that traditional research methods are inappropriate for family therapy. This position mischaracterizes modern day clinical researchers and research. In presenting 10 key dimensions of the research‐clinical practice issue in family therapy, this paper addresses some of these misrepresentations. If research and practice are to interact more productively, a major commitment, the scope and implications of which have not yet been realized, will need to be made. Actualizing the research‐practice link is a training problem and a fundamental professional issue. Progress in this realm would change the particulars of clinical practice as we know it. These processes will involve nothing less than remaking the culture of family therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)327-348
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Marital and Family Therapy
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991
Externally publishedYes

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Family Therapy
family therapy
Values
Research
research method
Research Personnel
commitment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

EMPIRICAL VALUES AND THE CULTURE OF FAMILY THERAPY. / Liddle, Howard A.

In: Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, Vol. 17, No. 4, 01.01.1991, p. 327-348.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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