Emerging importance of HDL cholesterol in developing high-risk coronary plaques in acute coronary syndromes

Juan Viles Gonzalez, Valentin Fuster, Roberto Corti, Juan J. Badimon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease is the principal cause of death in industrialized countries. Hyperlipidemia, with high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (<40mg/dL in men and <45 mg/dL in women), is a known major cardiovascular risk factor. Statins are considered the most potent and effective agents to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, but they have a variable effect on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides. Different clinical trials with statins have shown a decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 35% and a reduction of the incidence of coronary events by as much as 30%. However, 60 to 70% of events still occur, despite remarkable reduction of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration. Recent National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines highlighted the importance of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol is considered an independent risk factor and has an inverse relation with coronary events. The association of low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol with an increased incidence of cardiovascular events implies a critical role of high-density lipoprotein in the protection against atherosclerotic disease and in the progression of coronary atherosclerotic disease. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol appears to exert this protective effect through multiple mechanisms. High-density lipoprotein is not only involved in reverse cholesterol transport, but also prevents endothelial dysfunction; inhibits the homing of monocytes, apoptosis, platelet activation, and factor X activation; and has antioxidant properties. In this article the authors review the available experimental and clinical evidence supporting the importance of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol as a protective factor in coronary artery disease, and the strategies developed to increase high-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)286-294
Number of pages9
JournalCurrent Opinion in Cardiology
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Acute Coronary Syndrome
HDL Cholesterol
LDL Cholesterol
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
HDL Lipoproteins
Cardiovascular Diseases
Cholesterol
Factor X
Lipoprotein(a)
Incidence
Platelet Activation
Hyperlipidemias
Developed Countries
Coronary Disease
Disease Progression
Coronary Artery Disease
Monocytes
Cause of Death
Antioxidants
Clinical Trials

Keywords

  • Acute coronary syndromes
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Atherothrombosis
  • Coronary artery disease
  • HDL
  • Lipid-lowering therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Emerging importance of HDL cholesterol in developing high-risk coronary plaques in acute coronary syndromes. / Viles Gonzalez, Juan; Fuster, Valentin; Corti, Roberto; Badimon, Juan J.

In: Current Opinion in Cardiology, Vol. 18, No. 4, 01.07.2003, p. 286-294.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Viles Gonzalez, Juan ; Fuster, Valentin ; Corti, Roberto ; Badimon, Juan J. / Emerging importance of HDL cholesterol in developing high-risk coronary plaques in acute coronary syndromes. In: Current Opinion in Cardiology. 2003 ; Vol. 18, No. 4. pp. 286-294.
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