Elevated intraocular pressure and hypotony following silicone oil retinal tamponade for complex retinal detachment: Incidence and risk factors

Jeffrey D. Henderer, Donald L. Budenz, Harry W Flynn, Joyce C. Schiffman, William J Feuer, Timothy G. Murray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

76 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the incidence of and risk factors for persistently elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) and hypotony in patients who have undergone pars plana vitrectomy with silicone oil injection for the management of complex retinal detachment. Subjects and Methods: The medical records of 532 patients who underwent silicone oil injection for the management of complex retinal detachments between January 1, 1991, and December 31, 1996, at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Miami, Fla, were reviewed. Elevated IOP was defined as elevated IOP requiring an operation at any time postoperatively or a persistently elevated IOP of greater than 25 mm Hg at or after the 6-month visit. Hypotony was defined as a persistent IOP of 5 mm Hg or less at or after the 6-month visit. Patients with transient perioperative IOP fluctuations were not counted. Results: Survival analysis for patients without cytomegalovirus retinitis (n = 383) revealed that 12.9% had an elevated IOP and 14.1% had hypotony by 6 months, 21% had an elevated IOP and 20.3% had hypotony by 1 year, and 29.5% had an elevated IOP and 27.3% had hypotony by 2 years. Among patients with cytomegalovirus retinitis (n = 149), none had a persistently elevated IOP, 10% had hypotony by 6 months, and 5.9% had persistently elevated IOP and 10% developed chronic hypotony by 1 year. A history of glaucoma before silicone oil retinal tamponade (P = .03), diabetes mellitus (P = .02), and a high lOP on the first postoperative day (P = .006) were risk factors for elevated postoperative IOP in patients without cytomegalovirus retinitis. Risk factors for postoperative hypotony in patients without cytomegalovirus retinitis included preoperative hypotony (P<.001) and aphakia (P = .03). Conclusions: An elevated or low IOP often develops postoperatively in patients without cytomegalovirus retinitis who undergo silicone oil injection for the management of complex retinal detachment. Risk factors for an elevated postoperative IOP include a history of glaucoma, diabetes mellitus, and a high IOP on the first postoperative day. Risk factors for hypotony include preoperative hypotony and aphakia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)189-195
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Ophthalmology
Volume117
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1 1999

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Silicone Oils
Retinal Detachment
Intraocular Pressure
Incidence
Cytomegalovirus Retinitis
Aphakia
Glaucoma
Injections
Diabetes Mellitus
Temazepam
Vitrectomy
Survival Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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Elevated intraocular pressure and hypotony following silicone oil retinal tamponade for complex retinal detachment : Incidence and risk factors. / Henderer, Jeffrey D.; Budenz, Donald L.; Flynn, Harry W; Schiffman, Joyce C.; Feuer, William J; Murray, Timothy G.

In: Archives of Ophthalmology, Vol. 117, No. 2, 01.02.1999, p. 189-195.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Henderer, Jeffrey D. ; Budenz, Donald L. ; Flynn, Harry W ; Schiffman, Joyce C. ; Feuer, William J ; Murray, Timothy G. / Elevated intraocular pressure and hypotony following silicone oil retinal tamponade for complex retinal detachment : Incidence and risk factors. In: Archives of Ophthalmology. 1999 ; Vol. 117, No. 2. pp. 189-195.
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abstract = "Objective: To evaluate the incidence of and risk factors for persistently elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) and hypotony in patients who have undergone pars plana vitrectomy with silicone oil injection for the management of complex retinal detachment. Subjects and Methods: The medical records of 532 patients who underwent silicone oil injection for the management of complex retinal detachments between January 1, 1991, and December 31, 1996, at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Miami, Fla, were reviewed. Elevated IOP was defined as elevated IOP requiring an operation at any time postoperatively or a persistently elevated IOP of greater than 25 mm Hg at or after the 6-month visit. Hypotony was defined as a persistent IOP of 5 mm Hg or less at or after the 6-month visit. Patients with transient perioperative IOP fluctuations were not counted. Results: Survival analysis for patients without cytomegalovirus retinitis (n = 383) revealed that 12.9{\%} had an elevated IOP and 14.1{\%} had hypotony by 6 months, 21{\%} had an elevated IOP and 20.3{\%} had hypotony by 1 year, and 29.5{\%} had an elevated IOP and 27.3{\%} had hypotony by 2 years. Among patients with cytomegalovirus retinitis (n = 149), none had a persistently elevated IOP, 10{\%} had hypotony by 6 months, and 5.9{\%} had persistently elevated IOP and 10{\%} developed chronic hypotony by 1 year. A history of glaucoma before silicone oil retinal tamponade (P = .03), diabetes mellitus (P = .02), and a high lOP on the first postoperative day (P = .006) were risk factors for elevated postoperative IOP in patients without cytomegalovirus retinitis. Risk factors for postoperative hypotony in patients without cytomegalovirus retinitis included preoperative hypotony (P<.001) and aphakia (P = .03). Conclusions: An elevated or low IOP often develops postoperatively in patients without cytomegalovirus retinitis who undergo silicone oil injection for the management of complex retinal detachment. Risk factors for an elevated postoperative IOP include a history of glaucoma, diabetes mellitus, and a high IOP on the first postoperative day. Risk factors for hypotony include preoperative hypotony and aphakia.",
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T1 - Elevated intraocular pressure and hypotony following silicone oil retinal tamponade for complex retinal detachment

T2 - Incidence and risk factors

AU - Henderer, Jeffrey D.

AU - Budenz, Donald L.

AU - Flynn, Harry W

AU - Schiffman, Joyce C.

AU - Feuer, William J

AU - Murray, Timothy G.

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N2 - Objective: To evaluate the incidence of and risk factors for persistently elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) and hypotony in patients who have undergone pars plana vitrectomy with silicone oil injection for the management of complex retinal detachment. Subjects and Methods: The medical records of 532 patients who underwent silicone oil injection for the management of complex retinal detachments between January 1, 1991, and December 31, 1996, at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Miami, Fla, were reviewed. Elevated IOP was defined as elevated IOP requiring an operation at any time postoperatively or a persistently elevated IOP of greater than 25 mm Hg at or after the 6-month visit. Hypotony was defined as a persistent IOP of 5 mm Hg or less at or after the 6-month visit. Patients with transient perioperative IOP fluctuations were not counted. Results: Survival analysis for patients without cytomegalovirus retinitis (n = 383) revealed that 12.9% had an elevated IOP and 14.1% had hypotony by 6 months, 21% had an elevated IOP and 20.3% had hypotony by 1 year, and 29.5% had an elevated IOP and 27.3% had hypotony by 2 years. Among patients with cytomegalovirus retinitis (n = 149), none had a persistently elevated IOP, 10% had hypotony by 6 months, and 5.9% had persistently elevated IOP and 10% developed chronic hypotony by 1 year. A history of glaucoma before silicone oil retinal tamponade (P = .03), diabetes mellitus (P = .02), and a high lOP on the first postoperative day (P = .006) were risk factors for elevated postoperative IOP in patients without cytomegalovirus retinitis. Risk factors for postoperative hypotony in patients without cytomegalovirus retinitis included preoperative hypotony (P<.001) and aphakia (P = .03). Conclusions: An elevated or low IOP often develops postoperatively in patients without cytomegalovirus retinitis who undergo silicone oil injection for the management of complex retinal detachment. Risk factors for an elevated postoperative IOP include a history of glaucoma, diabetes mellitus, and a high IOP on the first postoperative day. Risk factors for hypotony include preoperative hypotony and aphakia.

AB - Objective: To evaluate the incidence of and risk factors for persistently elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) and hypotony in patients who have undergone pars plana vitrectomy with silicone oil injection for the management of complex retinal detachment. Subjects and Methods: The medical records of 532 patients who underwent silicone oil injection for the management of complex retinal detachments between January 1, 1991, and December 31, 1996, at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Miami, Fla, were reviewed. Elevated IOP was defined as elevated IOP requiring an operation at any time postoperatively or a persistently elevated IOP of greater than 25 mm Hg at or after the 6-month visit. Hypotony was defined as a persistent IOP of 5 mm Hg or less at or after the 6-month visit. Patients with transient perioperative IOP fluctuations were not counted. Results: Survival analysis for patients without cytomegalovirus retinitis (n = 383) revealed that 12.9% had an elevated IOP and 14.1% had hypotony by 6 months, 21% had an elevated IOP and 20.3% had hypotony by 1 year, and 29.5% had an elevated IOP and 27.3% had hypotony by 2 years. Among patients with cytomegalovirus retinitis (n = 149), none had a persistently elevated IOP, 10% had hypotony by 6 months, and 5.9% had persistently elevated IOP and 10% developed chronic hypotony by 1 year. A history of glaucoma before silicone oil retinal tamponade (P = .03), diabetes mellitus (P = .02), and a high lOP on the first postoperative day (P = .006) were risk factors for elevated postoperative IOP in patients without cytomegalovirus retinitis. Risk factors for postoperative hypotony in patients without cytomegalovirus retinitis included preoperative hypotony (P<.001) and aphakia (P = .03). Conclusions: An elevated or low IOP often develops postoperatively in patients without cytomegalovirus retinitis who undergo silicone oil injection for the management of complex retinal detachment. Risk factors for an elevated postoperative IOP include a history of glaucoma, diabetes mellitus, and a high IOP on the first postoperative day. Risk factors for hypotony include preoperative hypotony and aphakia.

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