Elevated endothelial microparticles in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

Findings from brain and renal microvascular cell culture and patients with active disease

Joaquin J Jimenez, Wenche Jy, Lucia M. Mauro, Lawrence L. Horstman, Yeon Ahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

171 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Endothelial injury is believed to be a key initiating event in the pathogenesis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), leading to platelet activation and formation of platelet-rich thrombi in microvasculature. However, the nature of endothelial injury in TTP is poorly defined and clinical assays to rapidly and reliably monitor endothelial damage are not readily available. Using flow cytometry, we measured endothelial microparticles (EMPs) generated from cultured renal and brain microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) during activation and apoptosis, and evaluated the effect of TTP plasma on them. EMPs were measured using positivity for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) CD31 and CD51, and their procoagulant activity was assessed using a Russell viper venom assay. Both cell lines generated procoagulant EMPs when cultured with inducers of activation (tumour necrosis factor alpha; TNF-α) or apoptosis (mitomycin C). TTP plasma induced a five- to sixfold increase of EMP generation and a two- to threefold increase of procoagulant activity in cultured brain and renal MVECs. TTP plasma induced a threefold and 13-fold increase of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression, respectively, on renal MVECs. Procoagulant activity tended to parallel EMP numbers. The effect of TTP plasma on cell viability was similar to that of TNF-α, implying that it induced activation rather than apoptosis. Control plasma and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) plasma had little effect. In the clinical study, EMP assay of blood from acute TTP patients showed levels markedly elevated compared with normal controls, but values returned to normal in remission. In conclusion, TTP plasma activated and induced injury to MVECs in culture, judged by production of EMP and expression of activation markers. Released procoagulant EMP may play a role in the pathogenesis of TTP. Assay of EMP may be a useful marker of disease activity and endothelial injury in TTP and possibly other thrombotic disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)81-90
Number of pages10
JournalBritish Journal of Haematology
Volume112
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 24 2001

Fingerprint

Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura
Cell Culture Techniques
Kidney
Brain
Endothelial Cells
Wounds and Injuries
Apoptosis
Russell's Viper
Viper Venoms
Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura
Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1
Platelet Activation
Mitomycin
Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1
Microvessels
Plasma Cells
Cell Survival
Flow Cytometry
Reference Values
Thrombosis

Keywords

  • Apoptosis
  • Endothelial activation
  • Endothelial microparticles
  • Thrombosis
  • Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

Elevated endothelial microparticles in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura : Findings from brain and renal microvascular cell culture and patients with active disease. / Jimenez, Joaquin J; Jy, Wenche; Mauro, Lucia M.; Horstman, Lawrence L.; Ahn, Yeon.

In: British Journal of Haematology, Vol. 112, No. 1, 24.02.2001, p. 81-90.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{cbe1bb41bc2b479d83b63711ba5f9324,
title = "Elevated endothelial microparticles in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: Findings from brain and renal microvascular cell culture and patients with active disease",
abstract = "Endothelial injury is believed to be a key initiating event in the pathogenesis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), leading to platelet activation and formation of platelet-rich thrombi in microvasculature. However, the nature of endothelial injury in TTP is poorly defined and clinical assays to rapidly and reliably monitor endothelial damage are not readily available. Using flow cytometry, we measured endothelial microparticles (EMPs) generated from cultured renal and brain microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) during activation and apoptosis, and evaluated the effect of TTP plasma on them. EMPs were measured using positivity for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) CD31 and CD51, and their procoagulant activity was assessed using a Russell viper venom assay. Both cell lines generated procoagulant EMPs when cultured with inducers of activation (tumour necrosis factor alpha; TNF-α) or apoptosis (mitomycin C). TTP plasma induced a five- to sixfold increase of EMP generation and a two- to threefold increase of procoagulant activity in cultured brain and renal MVECs. TTP plasma induced a threefold and 13-fold increase of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression, respectively, on renal MVECs. Procoagulant activity tended to parallel EMP numbers. The effect of TTP plasma on cell viability was similar to that of TNF-α, implying that it induced activation rather than apoptosis. Control plasma and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) plasma had little effect. In the clinical study, EMP assay of blood from acute TTP patients showed levels markedly elevated compared with normal controls, but values returned to normal in remission. In conclusion, TTP plasma activated and induced injury to MVECs in culture, judged by production of EMP and expression of activation markers. Released procoagulant EMP may play a role in the pathogenesis of TTP. Assay of EMP may be a useful marker of disease activity and endothelial injury in TTP and possibly other thrombotic disorders.",
keywords = "Apoptosis, Endothelial activation, Endothelial microparticles, Thrombosis, Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura",
author = "Jimenez, {Joaquin J} and Wenche Jy and Mauro, {Lucia M.} and Horstman, {Lawrence L.} and Yeon Ahn",
year = "2001",
month = "2",
day = "24",
doi = "10.1046/j.1365-2141.2001.02516.x",
language = "English",
volume = "112",
pages = "81--90",
journal = "British Journal of Haematology",
issn = "0007-1048",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Elevated endothelial microparticles in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

T2 - Findings from brain and renal microvascular cell culture and patients with active disease

AU - Jimenez, Joaquin J

AU - Jy, Wenche

AU - Mauro, Lucia M.

AU - Horstman, Lawrence L.

AU - Ahn, Yeon

PY - 2001/2/24

Y1 - 2001/2/24

N2 - Endothelial injury is believed to be a key initiating event in the pathogenesis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), leading to platelet activation and formation of platelet-rich thrombi in microvasculature. However, the nature of endothelial injury in TTP is poorly defined and clinical assays to rapidly and reliably monitor endothelial damage are not readily available. Using flow cytometry, we measured endothelial microparticles (EMPs) generated from cultured renal and brain microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) during activation and apoptosis, and evaluated the effect of TTP plasma on them. EMPs were measured using positivity for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) CD31 and CD51, and their procoagulant activity was assessed using a Russell viper venom assay. Both cell lines generated procoagulant EMPs when cultured with inducers of activation (tumour necrosis factor alpha; TNF-α) or apoptosis (mitomycin C). TTP plasma induced a five- to sixfold increase of EMP generation and a two- to threefold increase of procoagulant activity in cultured brain and renal MVECs. TTP plasma induced a threefold and 13-fold increase of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression, respectively, on renal MVECs. Procoagulant activity tended to parallel EMP numbers. The effect of TTP plasma on cell viability was similar to that of TNF-α, implying that it induced activation rather than apoptosis. Control plasma and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) plasma had little effect. In the clinical study, EMP assay of blood from acute TTP patients showed levels markedly elevated compared with normal controls, but values returned to normal in remission. In conclusion, TTP plasma activated and induced injury to MVECs in culture, judged by production of EMP and expression of activation markers. Released procoagulant EMP may play a role in the pathogenesis of TTP. Assay of EMP may be a useful marker of disease activity and endothelial injury in TTP and possibly other thrombotic disorders.

AB - Endothelial injury is believed to be a key initiating event in the pathogenesis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), leading to platelet activation and formation of platelet-rich thrombi in microvasculature. However, the nature of endothelial injury in TTP is poorly defined and clinical assays to rapidly and reliably monitor endothelial damage are not readily available. Using flow cytometry, we measured endothelial microparticles (EMPs) generated from cultured renal and brain microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) during activation and apoptosis, and evaluated the effect of TTP plasma on them. EMPs were measured using positivity for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) CD31 and CD51, and their procoagulant activity was assessed using a Russell viper venom assay. Both cell lines generated procoagulant EMPs when cultured with inducers of activation (tumour necrosis factor alpha; TNF-α) or apoptosis (mitomycin C). TTP plasma induced a five- to sixfold increase of EMP generation and a two- to threefold increase of procoagulant activity in cultured brain and renal MVECs. TTP plasma induced a threefold and 13-fold increase of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression, respectively, on renal MVECs. Procoagulant activity tended to parallel EMP numbers. The effect of TTP plasma on cell viability was similar to that of TNF-α, implying that it induced activation rather than apoptosis. Control plasma and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) plasma had little effect. In the clinical study, EMP assay of blood from acute TTP patients showed levels markedly elevated compared with normal controls, but values returned to normal in remission. In conclusion, TTP plasma activated and induced injury to MVECs in culture, judged by production of EMP and expression of activation markers. Released procoagulant EMP may play a role in the pathogenesis of TTP. Assay of EMP may be a useful marker of disease activity and endothelial injury in TTP and possibly other thrombotic disorders.

KW - Apoptosis

KW - Endothelial activation

KW - Endothelial microparticles

KW - Thrombosis

KW - Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035138106&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035138106&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1046/j.1365-2141.2001.02516.x

DO - 10.1046/j.1365-2141.2001.02516.x

M3 - Article

VL - 112

SP - 81

EP - 90

JO - British Journal of Haematology

JF - British Journal of Haematology

SN - 0007-1048

IS - 1

ER -