Eighteen-year follow-up demonstrates prolonged survival and enhanced quality of life for octogenarians after coronary artery bypass grafting

Paul A. Kurlansky, Donald B. Williams, Ernest A. Traad, Melinda Zucker, George Ebra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Octogenarians comprise the fastest growing population segment. Numerous reports have documented improved accomplishment of coronary artery bypass grafting in this high-risk cohort. But what is the quality of life after surgery, and how sustainable are the clinical benefits? Methods: Sequential cross-sectional analyses were performed on 1062 consecutive patients 80 years old and older who underwent isolated on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting at a single institution from 1989 to 2001. After mean follow-up of 3.4 years (1 month-12.6 years), the Short Form 36 quality of life survey was administered to all survivors. Late follow-up for survival was performed after a mean 5.6 years (1 month-17.9 years). Multivariate analyses assessed risk factors associated with operative mortality, Short Form 36 self-assessment, and late survival. Results: Mean age at operation was 83.1 ± 2.8 years (range, 80-99 years). Overall in-hospital mortality was 9.7%, decreasing progressively to 2.2% during the course of the study. At midterm follow-up, 97.1% of patients were in Canadian Cardiovascular Society class I or II; Short Form 36 scores were comparable to age-adjusted norms in both physical and mental health summary scores. Actuarial survivals were 42.2% ± 1.5% at 7 years and 9.9% ± 1.4% at 14 years. Median survival was 5.9 years; 5.2 years for male patients and 6.7 for female patients (P =.004). Conclusions: The risk of coronary artery bypass grafting for octogenarians now rivals that of a younger population. Midterm quality of life and long-term survival approach those of the general population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)394-399.e3
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume141
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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